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My Dog Ate Mums and Seems Constipated—What Do I Do?

Dr. Mark is a veterinarian. He has been working with dogs for more than 40 years.

Chrysanthemum poisoning can cause serious health problems in dogs. If left untreated, it can cause kidney damage.

Chrysanthemum poisoning can cause serious health problems in dogs. If left untreated, it can cause kidney damage.

Why Won't My Dog Poop After Eating Mums?

"About 10 days ago, my Alaskan Malamute Koda ate about seven or eight sticks of mums. He is 16 months old. He vomited right away, and his urine looked thick and dark but now looks more dilute.

He is not eating well and vomits once a day. He seems depressed, like he has a headache. He has not passed any stool in almost 24 hours. Can I give him a Colace?" —Michele

Chrysanthemum Poisoning in Dogs

Colace (1) is a stool softener and can be given for dogs that are constipated—but I do not think that is the case here.

Mums are toxic but usually cause vomiting and diarrhea, not constipation. It is much more likely that he is not defecating because he is not eating and there is nothing in the bowel. Colace is not going to help him.

Pyrethroid Toxins and Kidney Damage

Mums usually cause immediate signs of poisoning (like the vomiting you saw) but not signs later on if the dog survives the poisoning. However, the toxins in mums are pyrethroid and it is possible that he has some kidney damage and may not recover unless you have him treated.

Take Your Dog to the Vet ASAP

Please take him to your regular veterinarian right away and have his kidneys checked. He will need to have a urinalysis and blood chemistry. If they do not have an appointment available, explain that your dog has been poisoned, has symptoms, and needs to be seen right away.

He is still very young and if taken care of right away has a great chance of recovery.

Source

(1) National Center for Biotechnology Information (2022). PubChem Compound Summary for CID 23673837, Docusate sodium. Retrieved October 27, 2022 from https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Docusate-sodium.

This article is not meant to substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, or formal and individualized advice from your veterinarian. Animals exhibiting signs and symptoms of distress should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.

© 2022 Mark dos Anjos DVM