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How to Put Lovebirds Back in Their Cage

Updated on October 11, 2017
SakinaNasir53 profile image

Sakina loves birds. She had 2 IRN parrots and 2 budgies. Now she has 2 lovebirds, one of which is a peach-faced male hand-raised by her.

Introduction

Lovebirds are playful birds. They love staying out of their cage all the time. Tired of trying every possible method of putting your lovebirds back in their cage? Do you have an emergency on hand? Fear not, this article discusses some simple ways in which you can coax your pets into going back inside their cage.

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Lovebird Mumu waiting to jump out of his cage. Lovebird Lulu waiting to jump out of her cage.
Lovebird Mumu waiting to jump out of his cage.
Lovebird Mumu waiting to jump out of his cage. | Source
Lovebird Lulu waiting to jump out of her cage.
Lovebird Lulu waiting to jump out of her cage. | Source

Steps to Coax Your Lovebirds Back into Their Cage

Sometimes it's really annoying when lovebirds don't want to go inside their home or cage. In times of an emergency, there are some ways which may help you send your pet back inside his/her cage. Let's see what these are:

1. Placing

  • For this step, you have to first let your pet perch on your fingers.
  • Slowly take him/her towards the cage.
  • Put your hand inside the cage and slowly transfer your bird to one of the perches.
  • Quickly remove your hand and close the door of the cage.

Tip:

The above step is only possible if your lovebird is sleepy and inattentive.

2. The Balance Trick

  • For this step, you have to let your pet perch upon the cage's door.
  • Slowly raise your palm behind his/her back.
  • Your bird is likely to jump inside on a perch as his/her balance is disturbed.

3. The Toy Trick

  • Take your lovebird's favorite toy and place it behind the cage.
  • Make sure your pet sees the toy.
  • He/She will think that the toy is inside the cage and will rush to grab it.
  • You can shut the cage door after your pet gets inside.

4. The Finger Trick

  • Let your lovebird sit in front of/near the cage.
  • Slowly slide your fingers into the cage bar and shake them. One finger may do the trick.
  • Your lovebird will look at your fingers and jump inside the cage in an attempt to play with them.
  • You can close the cage door after he/she gets inside and remove your fingers from between the cage bars.

Caution:

While doing the above step, remove your fingers from between the cage bars as soon as your pet gets inside. Otherwise, it is likely that you may get a nasty bite. Birds are territorial of their cage and get protective of it easily.

5. The Food Trick

  • Take your lovebird's favorite fruit or vegetable. Most lovebirds love green, leafy vegetables like spinach. One of these will do the trick.
  • Place the fruit/vegetable behind the cage and move it slowly, making sure that your pet sees it.
  • He/she will surely run inside the cage to grab it.
  • If possible, either fix the fruit in between the cage bars or throw the spinach (if you use this) inside the cage. Your pet will be happy and think of it as a treat.

6. The Pretense Trick

  • For this trick, make sure that you have something which is completely new to your pet. Maybe a small rope, or a tiny thread. Anything which can raise his/her curiosity.
  • Wiggle the object in air and pretend that you're having fun. Your pet will fly towards you and will probably want to catch what you're holding in your hands.
  • Slowly move it behind the cage and try to squeeze it between the cage bars.
  • If your bird gets inside, you can close the cage door and remove the object from behind.

Tip:

This trick is beneficial when your pet is adamant on flying away when you try to put him/her inside the cage.

My Personal Experience

To give you a little idea about how I trick my lovebird into going inside the cage, I've included two videos that were shot while I did the trick.

The first video shows how Mumu, my lovebird, isn't willing to go inside the cage despite my urging him to go. Please watch the video below.

The second video shows Mumu, my lovebird, being tricked successfully into going inside the cage.

Why Won't My Lovebird Go Inside Their Cage?

The above question can be answered by looking closely at a lovebird's behavior. There are many reasons why your pet isn't interested in going back. Let us have a look at what these are:

1. Hunger

One of the most common reasons why your pet doesn't want to go inside his/her cage is hunger. They can't tell you they're hungry, but they can give you signs. So, the next time your pet doesn't want to step inside his/her cage, trying feeding him/her.

Once he/she is well fed, you'll notice that your pet has flown inside the cage by himself/herself!

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My lovebird, Mumu, loves to eat banana. My lovebird, Lulu, loves to eat grapes and likes to play with their tiny branches.
My lovebird, Mumu, loves to eat banana.
My lovebird, Mumu, loves to eat banana. | Source
My lovebird, Lulu, loves to eat grapes and likes to play with their tiny branches.
My lovebird, Lulu, loves to eat grapes and likes to play with their tiny branches. | Source

2. Attention

Lovebirds, or pets in general, want your attention all the time. They need to feel loved, pampered, and they want you to play with them. My male lovebird, Mumu, loves to sit on my shoulders and also plays by jumping on both of my knees. My female lovebird, Lulu, has begun to enjoy sitting on our shoulders recently, and she too tries to grab attention when she sits on my knees. Wanting attention is another reason why lovebirds don't want to go back to their cage.

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My lovebird, Mumu, doesn't want me to use my mobile and wants all my attention for himself. He is trying to distract me by chewing my mobile cover.My lovebirds, Mumu and Lulu, love sitting on my shoulder and try to grab my attention. My lovebird, Lulu, loves to grab my attention by sitting on my shoulder. She tries to preen/clean my cheek. My lovebird, Mumu, loves to try what I do. Here, he is trying to hold the TV remote.
My lovebird, Mumu, doesn't want me to use my mobile and wants all my attention for himself. He is trying to distract me by chewing my mobile cover.
My lovebird, Mumu, doesn't want me to use my mobile and wants all my attention for himself. He is trying to distract me by chewing my mobile cover. | Source
My lovebirds, Mumu and Lulu, love sitting on my shoulder and try to grab my attention.
My lovebirds, Mumu and Lulu, love sitting on my shoulder and try to grab my attention. | Source
My lovebird, Lulu, loves to grab my attention by sitting on my shoulder. She tries to preen/clean my cheek.
My lovebird, Lulu, loves to grab my attention by sitting on my shoulder. She tries to preen/clean my cheek. | Source
My lovebird, Mumu, loves to try what I do. Here, he is trying to hold the TV remote.
My lovebird, Mumu, loves to try what I do. Here, he is trying to hold the TV remote. | Source

3. Scratches

One reason why your lovebird won't leave your side is because he/she might want to be scratched (in case of hand-raised ones). At times, your pet will scratch his/her head against your palm or finger. Gently scratch their head, cheeks, and neck, and you'll find him/her getting sleepy soon. Pets love scratches as they feel itchy most of the time.

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Pets lovebirds really love to be scratched.
Pets lovebirds really love to be scratched.
Pets lovebirds really love to be scratched. | Source
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4. Sleep

When your pet feels sleepy, at times, he/she might want you to put them to sleep. They'll either rub their head against your palm and signal that they want to be scratched, or will become fluffy and "plop" down on you. My lovebird, Mumu, mostly loves to sleep on my thigh and on my palm at times.

After your pet falls asleep, you can gently carry and place him/her inside the cage (see step 1).

Click thumbnail to view full-size
My lovebird, Mumu, trying to fall asleep on my palm. My lovebird, Mumu, is feeling sleepy. When lovebirds get fluffy it means they are getting ready to sleep. My lovebird, Mumu, sleeping on my thigh.
My lovebird, Mumu, trying to fall asleep on my palm.
My lovebird, Mumu, trying to fall asleep on my palm. | Source
My lovebird, Mumu, is feeling sleepy. When lovebirds get fluffy it means they are getting ready to sleep.
My lovebird, Mumu, is feeling sleepy. When lovebirds get fluffy it means they are getting ready to sleep. | Source
My lovebird, Mumu, sleeping on my thigh.
My lovebird, Mumu, sleeping on my thigh. | Source

5. Freedom

Your pet doesn't want to go inside his/her cage simply because he/she doesn't want to be caged! Your pet needs freedom, the freedom to play and fly around your house, which is his/her house as well. They love being free because it is in their basic nature.

The next time your pet troubles you while you try to put him/her inside the cage, leave the trying and let him/her enjoy. Once your pet feels that the playing or flying is enough, he/she will go inside the cage without your need to run behind.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Lovebird mates love to play with each other.Lovebirds love to climb ropes. My lovebird, Mumu, is being naughty.
Lovebird mates love to play with each other.
Lovebird mates love to play with each other. | Source
Lovebirds love to climb ropes.
Lovebirds love to climb ropes. | Source
My lovebird, Mumu, is being naughty.
My lovebird, Mumu, is being naughty. | Source

Conclusion

This picture was taken when my lovebirds, Mumu and Lulu, sat on my sleeping dad's head. They wanted him to wake up and play with them.
This picture was taken when my lovebirds, Mumu and Lulu, sat on my sleeping dad's head. They wanted him to wake up and play with them. | Source

© 2017 Sakina Nasir

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    • SakinaNasir53 profile image
      Author

      Sakina Nasir 4 weeks ago from Kuwait

      Thank you so much! :) Lovebirds are active birds and love to play a lot.

    • profile image

      hatim 6 weeks ago

      really very effective article suprb great work keep it up

    • SakinaNasir53 profile image
      Author

      Sakina Nasir 6 weeks ago from Kuwait

      Hi, dear friend. :)

      Thank you so much once again, I've emailed you and hope to hear from you soon. Take care, buddy.

    • kenneth avery profile image

      Kenneth Avery 8 weeks ago from Hamilton, Alabama

      Dearest Sakina :)

      Sweet friend, you ARE always welcome. You deserve all of my compliments . . .and many more.

      Keep up the Great Work.

      Love,

      Kenneth

    • SakinaNasir53 profile image
      Author

      Sakina Nasir 8 weeks ago from Kuwait

      Hello, Kenneth, dearest buddy. :)

      Thank you so much for these warm comments about Mumu and Lulu. They say hi to you too and that you're an amazing writer yourself.

      Thank you reading and I'm glad you liked it. :)

    • kenneth avery profile image

      Kenneth Avery 8 weeks ago from Hamilton, Alabama

      Hi, Dearest Sakina :)

      What a delightful, highly-informative hub!

      Loved every word and your topic was not only a must-read for all who are interested in lovebirds, but a blessing to read.

      Say hi to Mumu and Lulu--and YOU, Dearest, keep up your fine work.