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How to Make a Hummingbird Feeder Wreath

Updated on June 23, 2016
Autumn Hummingbird Feeder Wreath
Autumn Hummingbird Feeder Wreath | Source

What Do Hummingbirds Look For?

Hummingbirds are suckers for bright colors like red, pink, orange, yellow and purple. If you wish to attract these little flying jewels, then you need to think like a hummer! What would you look for? Large bright flowers, or a garden full of the same, right? Or, in lieu thereof, a jewel-tone wreath right behind a hanging nectar feeder.


Male Ruby Throated Hummingbird likes the nectar feeder placed in front of my rose wreath!
Male Ruby Throated Hummingbird likes the nectar feeder placed in front of my rose wreath! | Source

My Wreaths Serve Four Purposes

1. They act like hummingbird magnets; like a big neon sign pointing to the food the hummers are craving.

2. The wreaths deter other birds from flying into my windows.

3. Gorgeous deep colors adorn my windows, and can be changed out with the seasons, even when my hummingbirds have flown back to South America for the winter!

4. Even if you have a tiny garden, or none at all, this feeder wreath will beckon to any hummer in the area.


Three rose wreaths and matching hummingbird feeders--one for each of my front windows.
Three rose wreaths and matching hummingbird feeders--one for each of my front windows. | Source

Do You Feed Hummingbirds:

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Ant moat attached to top of hummingbird feeder, does a good job of keeping ants away from the nectar.
Ant moat attached to top of hummingbird feeder, does a good job of keeping ants away from the nectar. | Source

This idea came about while I was watching a couple of hummingbirds checking over the rose wreaths that were hanging on my windows already. It seems they were testing the flowers to see if they held the sweet liquid that fuels their flights.

Since I didn’t want to disappoint them, I decided to add a nectar feeder to each of the three windows across the front of my house. Because ants like nectar as well as hummers, I added an ant moat that I found on Amazon.com, to each feeder. Magically, I have no ant problem, but I do have 3 times the hummingbirds that I usually have visiting my feeders!

TIP: Keep your ant moats filled with water, because ants will not cross this obstacle.

Never use toxic pesticide sprays or chemicals on or around nectar feeders, or the plants that provide the nectar for these amazing birds. Hummers often grab tiny insects from shrubs and plants as a protein source. In fact, I have seen a hummer pluck a tiny spider from its web, and then gather the spider silk for use as the soft lining in its nest. So Do Not Poison the Birds or their Food!

How to Make Your Own Grapevine Wreath

Materials you will need for making your Hummingbird Feeder Wreath.
Materials you will need for making your Hummingbird Feeder Wreath. | Source

Here’s what you will need for each wreath:

  • Grapevine wreath, either pre-made or one you have made yourself. Mine was 18” across, and that seemed to be the ideal size to showcase the Top Fill Hummingbird Feeders that I already had.
  • Wire (12 gauge is strong but flexible), or ‘S’ hook for hanging your wreath.
  • Scroll plant hanger with a double hook (and screws)to accommodate both the wreath and the feeder. I found my hangers at the local big box hardware center.
  • Wire Cutters, which can be found at your hobby or hardware center, to cut the flower stems.
  • Thick section of newspapers on which to assemble your wreath.
  • Selection of silk flowers ( I used 7 “bushes” from which I cut each flower) in a variety of pink, red, purple, orange or yellow contrasting or complimentary seasonal colors.
  • Garden gloves to protect your hands when working with the grapevine and wire stems.

Approximate Cost of Materials for Making Wreath

Item
Cost Locally
18" Grapevine Wreath on sale
$4.99
7 Autumn Flower 'Bushes' @$1.09 on sale
$7.63
Double Scroll Plant Hanger
$2.99
'S' Hook
$ 0.25
Total
$15.86
Double Scroll Plant Hanger.  This can be mounted with the scrolls facing the ground or facing upwards as I did.
Double Scroll Plant Hanger. This can be mounted with the scrolls facing the ground or facing upwards as I did. | Source
Electric drill, set of drill bits and screwdriver for attaching the scroll plant hanger.
Electric drill, set of drill bits and screwdriver for attaching the scroll plant hanger. | Source

Before You Start Making Your Wreath

  • Install your double scroll plant hanger above the window, or on the window frame, using the screws that came with it. You will need a drill and suitably-sized drill bit for this. I happen to own an electric drill, but you could use a rechargeable drill. I installed the scroll hangers myself, so if I can do it, you can too! Remember to choose a drill bit that is smaller than the diameter of the screw.
  • Before you begin to add the flowers to your wreath foundation, look to see if there is a way to hang it. Mine came with a small wire circle so that I could attach my ‘S’ hook. If yours is missing a hanging wire, it’s a simple thing to make your own. This is best done before anything else so that you can find the perfect spot.

Metal Fastener For Hanging Grapevine Wreath

Metal hook that came already inserted into the grapevine.  I could then attach my 'S' hook to that for easy hanging.
Metal hook that came already inserted into the grapevine. I could then attach my 'S' hook to that for easy hanging. | Source
I used my fingers to twist the ends of this loop around each other.  You may wish to use a pair of needle nose pliers instead.
I used my fingers to twist the ends of this loop around each other. You may wish to use a pair of needle nose pliers instead. | Source

Making Your Own Wire Loop

1. Lay a thickness of newspapers on the surface where you will be working.

2. Hold your wreath up to see how you want to orient it on your window. Some wreaths are more oval than others.

3. Cut a piece of 12 gauge wire approximately 12” long.

TIP: You should check your wreath by holding it up to the window to see how far down you want it to end up. The wire loop on the back of the wreath may need to be longer or shorter--it’s best to ‘dry fit it’ first.)

4. Poke one end of the wire through the top back of your wreath.


5. Twist the ends of the wire together several times, making a large, secure loop.

.
If you make your own wire loop large enough to fit over the scroll plant holder, you won’t need the ‘S’ hook

Flower stems woven into the back of the grapevine wreath.
Flower stems woven into the back of the grapevine wreath. | Source

TIP: Because I change my flowers out seasonally, I do not permanently attach them. Rather, I poke the stem into the wreath where I want the flower to be. On the reverse side of the wreath, I weave the stem end back through and into the grapevine so that the end does not show from either side. That way I can use the wreath and flowers again, and it’s like I have a brand new creation!

With wire cutters, snip the stems just above the thickest part of the 'bush'.
With wire cutters, snip the stems just above the thickest part of the 'bush'. | Source
Begin by adding flowers starting with your focal point.   I had some interesting green berry stems that I used for dividing my wreath into thirds.
Begin by adding flowers starting with your focal point. I had some interesting green berry stems that I used for dividing my wreath into thirds. | Source
Fill in with various colors, sizes or types of flowers until you are pleased with your creation.
Fill in with various colors, sizes or types of flowers until you are pleased with your creation. | Source

Making Your Wreath

  • If you have purchased flowers that come in a ‘bush’ rather than single stems, use the wire cutters to snip each flower stem close to the point where they are all attached to the ‘bush’ end.
  • I like to sort my stems by color so I know how many I have for each section. I divide my wreath into thirds, just doing so by eye. Take the flower you have chosen to be the focal point (I decided the darkest and largest red flowers would go in first) and place three of them fairly equally around the wreath. Threes just seem to look more balanced and more pleasing than other numbers, to me anyway.
  • Continue adding your flowers, filling in with smaller ones when you see a gap or a place that needs a little more fullness. When you have finished, turn the wreath over and bend and poke in any ends that are hanging out. You don’t want them scraping against your windows when the wind blows. Don’t ask me how I know about this!
  • Install your wreath on the scroll hanger loop that is closest to the window, and the nectar feeder on the outermost loop of the scroll hanger.

To Permanently Attach Flowers to Your Wreath

You may wish to permanently fasten your flowers by leaving just enough on the stem to support the flower, then daub a bit of hot glue on the end, and position it into the grapevine wreath. This will secure your floral wreath against the elements. However, I have seldom found that any of my flowers have dropped from the wreath. It’s totally up to you, depending upon if you want to re-use the grapevine wreath someday.


Finished Autumn Hummingbird Feeder Wreath.
Finished Autumn Hummingbird Feeder Wreath. | Source

Be Creative and Have Fun!

If you prefer to add just one bunch of flowers to the lower or upper section of your wreath, by all means do so. Like I said, you make the rules. I would caution against adding a bow that might have ends flapping in the breeze, though, as this would probably spook your birds and keep them from using the nectar feeder, which was the whole point in making this fun project!

Important Reminder

Just a parting reminder that now is not the time to forget about keeping your nectar feeders filled. Soon your hummingbirds will be leaving for their long and arduous non-stop autumnal flight across the Gulf of Mexico. That these tiny creatures can accomplish this just blows my mind! They will need all the fuel they can load up on before they depart.

The best thing you can do for hummingbirds is make sure your feeders are clean, the nectar is fresh, and there is plenty of it. My hummingbirds leave on or about September 15th. However, they appeared this spring about two weeks earlier than I have seen before. It is quite possible their departure times will be just as unpredictable.


Hummingbird perched on a tiny branch in the early morning light.
Hummingbird perched on a tiny branch in the early morning light. | Source

If you’re like me, you’ll miss these energetic diminutive acrobats, but you’ll feel better knowing you have helped them survive to complete yet another impossible journey!

Tell Me About Your Hummingbirds!

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    • grandmapearl profile image
      Author

      Connie Smith 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Thank you Eileen! Your comments have truly brightened this dreary and chilly day. My hummers have left for the winter, but I know they will be back again come May. I'll be making some special springtime wreaths for them to enjoy. You can tell I love my hummingbirds!

      I'm so glad you stopped by for a visit. Hope you have a lovely day ;) Pearl

    • Eileen Hughes profile image

      Eileen Hughes 3 years ago from Northam Western Australia

      Beautiful wreath and great pictures and descriptions they are a credit to you.

    • grandmapearl profile image
      Author

      Connie Smith 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      radhikasree, thank you so much for your lovely compliments. I love my hummingbirds and thoroughly enjoy watching their antics as they fly in for nectar. I can stand still right in the center of the activity, and they buzz around my head so closely that I feel the breeze from their wings!

      I'm so glad you stopped by for a visit, and I hope you enjoy your day ;) Connie

    • grandmapearl profile image
      Author

      Connie Smith 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Thank you Deb! Your praise makes me very happy. I will definitely submit this to Birds and Blooms magazine, which is one of my favorites. Thanks for the suggestion and the ego boost! Enjoy your day ;) Connie

    • radhikasree profile image

      Radhika Sreekanth 3 years ago from Mumbai,India

      The wreath is gorgeous! Your creativity sparkles here.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      As always, Connie, another wonderful work of art! Yes, you are an artistic writer. Make a submission to Birds and Blooms magazine. I think this would do well, as a matter of fact.

    • grandmapearl profile image
      Author

      Connie Smith 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Oh wow, bravewarrior, are you available? I am in need of a whole house makeover! No, seriously ;) Pearl

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      Pearl, actually I love to decorate. I looked into doing it for a living (interior design) but it requires schooling. At my age, I don't want to go to school. I'll settle for the joy I get when friends ask me to design room make-overs for them.

    • grandmapearl profile image
      Author

      Connie Smith 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      bravewarrior, how are you today, my friend? Thank you for the wonderful compliments. You must be a decorator at heart--it did not occur to me that the wreaths added texture, but you are absolutely correct! You always know exactly what to say to make my whole day brighter!

      I just love my hummingbirds. This year they have been very comical, banging into each other and playing tag, sort of like the 3 Stooges! There are at least 9 of them that I have been able to count. Right now a lot of hummingbird-friendly flowers are in bloom, like my Rose of Sharon bushes--they actually jockey for position on those shrubs!

      I hope you have an awesome day, my friend ;) Pearl

    • grandmapearl profile image
      Author

      Connie Smith 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      purl3agony, I love your handle! It tells me that you have attempted knitting at some point, which is one of my favorite hobbies (although I get the impression that it may not be one of yours)! I'm glad to know that you have several hummingbirds visiting your feeder--that is good news. Let me know how the new wreath works for you. I'd love to see your finished product!

      Thanks so much for visiting, and for your comments. Have a wonderful day ;) Pearl

    • grandmapearl profile image
      Author

      Connie Smith 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Dear Eddy, I know you have no hummingbirds in Wales. But I knew you would appreciate the bright, sunny colors of this wreath. I do love seeing the different birds in your part of the world--so colorful and friendly; I'm sure your feathered visitors can tell you are a Nature Girl, and that you truly appreciate their presence on this Earth.

      Your supportive and encouraging comments make me smile and warm my heart, my dear friend. Your friendship means the world to me! Thank you for visiting, voting and sharing. You're the best ;) Pearl

    • grandmapearl profile image
      Author

      Connie Smith 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Hi Jeanne, I'm so pleased that you stopped by; and that you will be making wreaths for your hummingbirds. The great thing is that you can make seasonal changes, even when the hummers have departed for their South American digs. I have a blast re-inventing mine at Christmas time!

      Have a wonderful day ;) Pearl

    • grandmapearl profile image
      Author

      Connie Smith 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Hi Jill, I am gratified to hear that you have more hummingbirds this year--that is very good news. I don't doubt it though, with all your beautiful flowers, especially what I call 'wild flowers'! These little guys are drawn to flowers they know will give them lots of energy-packed nectar. Every year I have a bumper crop of jewel weed, and that is a hummer favorite. I never had to plant it--the birds did that for me!

      Thank you as always for your votes and super comments, my friend ;) Pearl

    • grandmapearl profile image
      Author

      Connie Smith 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      pstraubie, thank you! I can promise that if there are hummers in the area, they will be drawn to the bright colors of a wreath. I am so pleased you are going to give this a try. I would be very interested to know if it worked for you. Thank you so much for sharing this idea with others, and for pinning. Your supportive votes and wonderfully encouraging comments are always so much appreciated. I send you smiles and gratefully receive the Angels ;) Pearl

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      Pearl, your wreaths are beautiful. Not only do they attract the hummingbirds (and butterflies, I bet!) but they add color and texture to your home. What a great idea you have here! Hummingbirds are fascinating little creatures!

    • purl3agony profile image

      Donna Herron 3 years ago from USA

      Love this idea!! Such a pretty wreath and a great way to attract the hummingbirds! We have 3 or 4 hummingbirds visiting a small feeder we have hanging from our window, but it's an eyesore. This wreath idea will certainly make it more attractive and cheerful. Thanks!

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

      Wow Pearl what glorious colours in that wreath and yes I also second Bill's comment .

      I feel so humbled that through my writing I have been able to make wonderful friends and I can always relate to all you write Pearl; except you are a little more knowledgeable than me when it comes to birds. This I like too because you inspire me on no end.

      Voting this one up Pearl and sharing onto A Brand New Dawn. Have a wonderful day and lots of love from my little corner of Wales.

      Eddy.

    • Jeanne Grunert profile image

      Jeanne Grunert 3 years ago from Virginia

      What great ideas! Can't wait to try them!

    • The Dirt Farmer profile image

      Jill Spencer 3 years ago from United States

      You're just full of great ideas! I've noticed more hummingbirds in the garden this year than ever before & will have to try this so we can get a better look at them. Lovely hub. Voted up, etc.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 3 years ago from sunny Florida

      You are so clever!!! I do not have any hummingbirds this year. I have to give this a try. Am sharing too as I know many will want to know this.

      I will let you know the results.

      Pinned and shared and voted up up and away Angels are on the way ps

    • grandmapearl profile image
      Author

      Connie Smith 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Why thank you, Billy! The pat on the back and the vote of confidence are making me smile all over the place! I am so pleased that you want to give this project a try. Your hummingbirds will thank you, I promise. I am very well, thank you, and I hope you are the same my friend ;) Pearl

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Folks, if you want to know about caring for birds, this is the lady to talk to. Connie knows her stuff!

      Great, creative ideas my friend. You can bet I'll be making some of these next spring. Thank you and I hope you are well.

      bill