DogsCatsFish & AquariumsReptiles & AmphibiansRodentsRabbitsExotic PetsBirdsFarm Animals as Pets

Tips for Caring for Your First Pet Budgie (Parakeet)

Updated on August 4, 2017
Budgies are friendly, lovable pets.
Budgies are friendly, lovable pets. | Source

Cheerful Friend

Budgies, which are more commonly known as parakeets, are excellent starter birds for those who have never owned a pet bird and would like to have a feathered friend. They generally have a cheerful disposition, are not as demanding as many larger birds, and are relatively hardy. As single birds, they make good companions and enjoy interacting with their owners. Anyone who is willing to learn about these bubbly little birds and their care should be able to bring one home and have several years of companionship with their new pet.

A Little Bit About the Bird

Budgerigars, or "budgies" for short, are natives of Australia. Though they are commonly referred to as parakeets, this term can actually apply to a number of parrot species. The two types of domestic budgies are the British budgerigar and the "regular" budgerigar. The British budgie is a much larger bird than its regular cousin. In this article I will be focusing on the regular sort of budgerigar, as this is the variety most commonly available in the United States.

Budgies are petite, hook-billed birds which, in captivity, live mainly on a diet of seeds, fresh fruits, and veggies. They typically will live twelve to fourteen years, if you take good care of them. Budgies are flock birds in the wild, so if you want a budgie that will interact with you, you must keep only one bird to a cage. The object is for the bird to see you as its "flock". If it has other birds sharing its cage, your budgie will bond with them rather than you. Budgies are intelligent little creatures, and can be taught to talk and to do small tricks. Once again, it is necessary to keep the bird by itself in order for it to learn to talk or do tricks.

While wild budgies always have vibrant green body plumage and yellow heads, selective breeding in captivity has produced birds with quite a few variations in feather color and pattern. Most of these birds will be some shade of green or blue with an accent color, though there are budgies that are all-yellow or white.

Budgies can be sexed as adults by looking at their cere, which is the little band at the top of the beak where the nostrils are located. Male budgies will sport a blue or lavender-blue cere, while females' ceres are a dull brown or tan. Juvenile budgies all have pinkish-lavender ceres. It is not possible to sex a budgie on sight when they are a juvenile. If you are keeping a single bird, it does not matter whether you can tell its sex before you buy it, as both sexes can be equally affectionate.

A male budgerigar.
A male budgerigar. | Source

Finding the Right Bird

As a prospective budgie owner, you have two options available as to where you can obtain a bird. The first option would to be to purchase it from a breeder. This can be an excellent choice, as these birds are often hand-raised and very used to human interaction. The drawback here, on the other hand, is that these birds are usually more expensive than those you would find at a pet store. You can find breeders in your area online, in the phone directory, or at a bird show. Make sure you buy from someone who is a reputable breeder, though, to avoid getting a bird that is ill or has physical problems.

Buying your bird from a good pet store is your second option. Pet store budgies, while cheaper than those bought directly from a breeder, are not always particularly friendly at first. This is due to the fact that many of them are raised without much human handling. When they are brought to the pet store, they are put in an aviary with a dozen other budgies and still are not handled. As flock birds they are content with other budgies and do not know what to make of people. In the end, this leaves you with a bird that is normally not ready to just hop on your finger. So when going to a pet store to purchase a budgie, know that you may have to work with it a while to get it to trust you and be finger-trained.

Whether you decide to buy from a breeder or a pet store, there are a few things which you should check before purchasing the bird:

  1. The area where the birds are kept should be clean and dry.
  2. The birds themselves should be free of any sign of illness (vents clean, eyes clear, ceres not crusty, no sign of mites, no labored breathing, no bird sitting very still in the corner by itself with its feathers ruffled up). Even if the bird you like is healthy, do not buy it if there are others in the pen or cage that appear to be ill.
  3. The bird you like should not have physical issues, such as an overgrown or crooked beak.

A naturally-shaped perch is beneficial to your budgie's feet.
A naturally-shaped perch is beneficial to your budgie's feet. | Source
Toys like this can provide hours of fun for your bird.
Toys like this can provide hours of fun for your bird. | Source

Things to Buy for Your Budgie

The most important thing you will buy for your bird is its cage. Since this is where it will spend the bulk of its time, a cage must be large enough for the bird to move about freely; otherwise, the bird will be an unhappy creature. At minimum, the cage should be 14" long x 11" wide x 12" high. Remember, once food dishes, perches, and toys are added, the actual space in which your pet has to move about will be diminished. Please resist the "starter kits" some pet stores offer if the cage they include is smaller than the above dimensions. I know it will seem like a good deal at the time, but it will not be good for your bird in the end. If you can afford an even larger cage, then get it. Your bird will thank you. We as humans go through busy times when we cannot give our pets as much playtime as they want/need, so if the bird has a bigger play-space it will not mind some alone-time quite so much. Whatever size cage you buy, make sure the bars are no more than half an inch apart. This will prevent your budgie from getting its head caught between the bars. Also, try to find one with bars made from heavy wire, as the bars tend to bend easily on cages with thin bars. Finally, a cage with a non-toxic coating on the bars is best as it prevents rust from developing.

Most cages come with one or two dowel-style perches. I recommend removing one of these perches, however, and replacing it with two or three other types of perches. Other types of perches available include natural branch perches and shaped sand perches. The reason for this is your budgie needs a variety of differently-shaped perches on which to sit in order to keep its feet healthy. Straight dowels do not offer the shape variation that is necessary. The shaped, sand-covered perches have the added benefit of helping to keep the bird's claws trimmed (though toenail clipping will still be necessary from time to time).

The other thing that cages come equipped with is food and water dishes. You will also want to buy a separate cup in which you can put treat seed or fresh foods.

Buying a good budgie/parakeet food for your pet is essential. There are seed and pellet varieties on the market for budgies, and both have their pros and cons. In spite of all the choices available, I would suggest that as a first-time owner you stick with the food that the bird was already being fed when you bought it. Sometimes you can convert a bird from seed to pellets or vice versa, but it does not always happen and is better attempted by someone with experience. Your new bird may notice if you try to feed it a different brand of food and not eat it, so when you are starting out it is better to stick with what the bird already knows. You want to make your budgie's transition into your home as stress-free as possible.

Other accoutrements necessary for your bird are a cuttle bone or mineral treat, toys, and a cage skirt. The cuttle bone and mineral treat serve roughly the same purpose, which is to keep your bird's beak trimmed to the proper length. The toys are an important part of a budgie's existence. A bored bird is not a happy bird. If you want you budgie to interact with you, then avoid toys with mirrors, because it will think it has another bird in the cage and prefer the company of the "mirror bird". Some good toys that budgies like are little balls, twirly toys, rings, chew toys, and bells. My budgie loves bells, and almost all of his toys feature bells because of this. Do not be surprised, however, if your bird looks at a new toy as if it is enemy no. 1. The budgie is merely making sure the new addition to its cage is not going to eat it, and will usually warm up to the new plaything within a day or two (or three...). The cage skirt is for your benefit rather than the bird's. Like all types of pet birds, budgies can be a bit messy, so it is easier to keep the mess contained to the cage when there is a skirt on the outside of the cage.

There are a few items that you can skip buying and use a substitute at home to save money. The first would be a cage cover; they look nice but a clean towel does the trick for putting your bird to bed at night. The second thing to skip is corn cob litter or cage liners to put in the bottom of the cage. Newspaper or paper towels work just as well as the store-bought items (do not use newspaper, though, if your bird's cage does not have a grating in the bottom that separates him from contact with the newsprint). The final item that you most likely will not need to buy is a stand. An end table, nightstand, or some other flat surface where the cage cannot be knocked over is sufficient. The exception to this would be if you have cats in the house (or dogs that like to chase birds); a stand that keeps the cage well out of the reach of a curious feline is best.

An example of a basic cage set-up for a budgie. (Pardon the absence of a mineral treat—I did not have one to use.)
An example of a basic cage set-up for a budgie. (Pardon the absence of a mineral treat—I did not have one to use.) | Source
View of a budgie cage from above. Perches and toys can be arranged in such a way that best suits your bird.
View of a budgie cage from above. Perches and toys can be arranged in such a way that best suits your bird. | Source

Life With Your New Pet

When you bring home your new budgie, set its cage up first, before taking the bird out of the carrier in which you brought it home. The location of the cage within your home is an important thing to decide. The kitchen is generally not a good place, due to the high level of activity in the room and the potential hazard of toxins being released into the air from singed non-stick pans. Many kitchens also have doors leading to the outside in or near them, which can cause drafts. You do not want your bird to sit in a draft, as it is not good for its health. A bedroom, office, or corner of a family living area are the best places to put a bird cage. If you find noise distracting, though, you may not want to put the bird near a home work space. Budgies tend to be chatterboxes, which makes them entertaining; this can become obnoxious, however, if you need quiet! Not all budgies are this way, but quieter birds seem to be the exception. You will not know until you get the bird settled in and used to its surroundings whether it will be noisy or a moderate twitter-bug. Do not always assume that covering the bird will make it quiet until you want to get up in the morning; mine has been known to start his chirping at five a.m. (granted, this is normally because he hears someone up already).

Once you have found spot for the cage, put it together and stick whatever absorbent material you have chosen to use in the bottom. Place the perches next, with consideration as to what configuration will allow the bird to move to move about the cage freely. Make sure to put perches by the food and water cups (I stick the one long dowel-rod perch in front of the dishes in order to leave more play room in the rest of the cage). Know that you can always rearrange the perches if necessary. Add the toys to the cage after this, along with the mineral treat or cuttle bone. Fill the food dish and water dish.

The best way to put your new friend in its home is to take the top off of the cage and gently place the bird inside of it. Only do this if the bird's wings are already clipped, though! If the budgie's wings are not clipped, or the cage top does not come off easily, then put it in the cage through the door. On a cage that has a "guillotine-style" door (one that slides up and down), it is better to first secure the door in the "up" position with a clip or twist-tie so as to avoid accidentally dropping the door on budgie's head. (Make sure you secure the door this way any time you want to move the bird in or out of its cage.) Partially cover the cage, and give the bird a day or two to adjust to its new surroundings. This means do not take it out of its cage, put your hand in its cage, or even talk to it too much (especially in a loud voice) during this time. It will most likely be freaking out at being put in a totally new environment and will need some space. Birds and stress do not go well together, so give your pet the peace and quiet it needs.

After your bird has become accustomed to its new abode, you can begin to interact with it. If the bird is already finger-trained and has its wings clipped, you can easily take it out of the cage and start getting acquainted. If it has its wings clipped but is not finger-trained, teaching the bird to "step up" onto your finger requires just a little bit of time and persistence.

First, put your hand slowly into the cage, approaching the bird from below rather than above (it thinks you are an attacker coming to eat it if your hand swoops down on it). Some birds will not like your hand in the cage at all, so you may have to spend the first day or two just getting it used to your hand being in the cage. Once the bird is comfortable with your hand being near it, take your index finger and place it gently against the bird's front, right above its feet. As you do this, say in a soft voice, "step up". The gentle pressure against its front will usually cause the bird to crawl on your finger. If not, then try again a few more times. The point of saying "step up" is that you want the bird to learn to get onto your finger without having to put pressure on its chest. Budgies can master this trick in a day, but it may take more time than that with your bird. If it does not learn the first day, do not push it, but let it rest and try again the next day. I do not recommend that a first-time bird owner take their budgie out of the cage unless its wings are clipped. It can easily injure itself running into things if it flies away from you. If the store from which you purchased it would not or could not clip its wings, try to find a friend that has experience clipping wings or go to an avian vet. If these options do not exist for you, you can learn to do it yourself, but, please, be very careful and make sure you understand thoroughly what you need to do before attempting it. You can seriously injure your bird if you are not careful.

Once you and your budgie have become friends, your bird will enjoy having playtime with you or simply sitting on your shoulder. Giving your pet some "shoulder-time" while you read or watch TV is a great way to bond. An old towel works as a protection against bird droppings on your clothes; make sure it is a dishcloth sort of towel rather than a bath towel, however, since a budgie's little talons can get stuck in the loops of a bath towel.

One thing you should never do to your bird while interacting with it is kiss it on the beak. Human saliva is toxic to budgies. You should also avoid using aerosols or other types of sprays round the bird; budgie's lungs are delicate and breathing in those sorts of things can be harmful to your pet.

It is best to find a good avian vet as soon as possible after purchasing your budgie. Budgies are relatively hardy for their size, but you should always keep a lookout for signs of illness and contact your vet if you suspect your bird may be ill. Signs of illness include wheezing, labored breathing, runny eyes or cere, a crusty cere, loose droppings, a loss of feathers (with no new growth—molting is normal), abnormal growths on the head, not eating, and sitting very still and quiet in a corner with ruffled feathers. While this is a list of some of the most common signs of sickness, it is not complete. As you get to know your bird, you will notice any abnormalities in its behaviour. This will enable you to act quickly if you think it is unwell. Quick action is necessary as illnesses in these little birds are often fatal if left untreated.

Feeding your bird fruit, veggies, and treats in addition to its regular food is a great idea as it adds variation and extra nutrients to your pet's diet. Make sure you put these items in a separate cup from the regular food, and limit the amount of treat seed and millet you give your bird. Budgies can become overweight, and extra weight is not healthy for the bird. Fresh greens like spinach and arugula, and fruits like apples and oranges (sans the seeds) are all budgie-safe fresh foods that can be given in moderate amounts. If you are not buying organic produce, make sure to thoroughly wash items that cannot be peeled in order to remove pesticide residue. Since not all fruits and veggies are safe for your bird to eat, please check out this list before trying any items other than the ones I have mentioned here. Avoid giving your bird "people food", as most of it is entirely unhealthy for birds and some things can also be toxic. When feeding your bird, give it enough seed in its cup to last a couple of days or so and then re-fill it when it has eaten most of the seed (make sure not to mistake the seed hulls the bird leaves behind as uneaten food). Change the water at least every other day. If your budgie seems to enjoy bathing in its drinking water, try putting a shallow dish in the cage now and then and encourage it to use that instead. Budgies do not need to bathe as much as some birds because they live in an arid climate in the wild.

If there is a grate in the bottom of the cage, then the absorbent material in the tray should only need to be changed once a week since the bird has no contact with the tray. If there is no grating, then change the material in the tray every couple of days. The whole cage should be wiped down once a month. Every few months it is good to take the cage apart and wash it thoroughly with mild dish soap to remove the gunk that builds up around the edges and in the corners.

Use a cage skirt to keep your budgie's mess inside the cage.
Use a cage skirt to keep your budgie's mess inside the cage. | Source

Wonderful Pets

My budgie has been a wonderful little pet and I will always be glad that I decided to bring him into my life. He is a sweet creature that makes me smile at his antics and happy chatter. If you are looking for a pet that is small, cheerful, affectionate, and relatively easy to keep, then I most heartily recommend that you welcome one of these birds into your home.

Source

What made you decide to keep a budgie as a pet?

See results

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 3 weeks ago

      @ Rahul: Is the bird's wings trimmed? If so, that's why he cannot fly properly. His flight feathers will eventually grow back, however. If his wings aren't trimmed, though, and he has a physical problem, can you take him back to the breeder?

      If taking him back isn't an option, I would say that if he truly has a physical problem, the best route would be to see if the others get along with him. If they do (as in not picking on him and letting him eat/drink), then he'll be fine with them. If not, then you should put him in a separate cage.

    • profile image

      Rahul 3 weeks ago

      Hi,

      I got a new pair of budgie, but the breeder gave me adult female & a male who can't even fly properly !!

      Moreover, I have 4 more pairs of budgies In a cage.

      So, what should I do ?

      Is it safe to keep the male with others ?

      Please reply

      Thanks

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 4 weeks ago

      @ RibMountainMom: You are welcome. I'm glad I could help you out! Your question is quite valid, by the way. I have always thought it good to give the bird a little ventilation, especially if you are using a towel. Whether you use a towel or a thinner fabric depends on where the bird will be sleeping. If the bird is kept in a main area where people may stay up later or get up earlier than it, you may want to opt for a towel to help lessen the amount of sound and light coming into the cage. If it will be sleeping in a spot that will allow it a full night's rest (such as your daughter's bedroom), then a thinner cover would be fine.

    • profile image

      RibMountainMom 4 weeks ago

      Thank you for sharing your knowledge on all things parakeet! We are considering getting a budgie as my eight-year-old daughter's first pet. This may seem like an odd question, but when you cover the cage at night, do you cover it completely? I'm wondering if one side needs to remain open or vented for oxygen. Also, do you recommend a towel or thinner cotton fabric?

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 6 weeks ago

      @ Kris.E: It is normal for the bird to be uncertain of its new surroundings, especially when those surroundings include other birds. Give her a few days to adjust, and she should be fine. She probably is eating and drinking, just not when you are looking. As long as the other two aren't keeping her from the food and water, she will come down and help herself when she feels like it. You can keep an eye on her to make sure she doesn't become too stressed (constant heavy breathing is a good indicator of stress), but I wouldn't worry. I would also recommend not putting your hand near her while she adjusts over the next couple of days. Let her get used to her new home, and then start to befriend her. Enjoy your newest addition!

    • profile image

      Kris.E 6 weeks ago

      Hey so I got a new parakeet yesterday and now they are three. My other parakeet is VERY friendly and peaceful.

      My new parakeet and kind of like scared. I didn't see him eat or drink since last night

      I'm afraid something might happen. It's a female parakeet. What should I do in this case to help her get comfortable? I tried to hand feed her millets but it didn't work. She is scared of my hand. Thank You.

      Kris.E

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 7 weeks ago

      @ Prashant: I am glad you found my article to be helpful. Did you mean some of your birds are losing their feathers? If they are losing only a few feathers that are then being replaced with new ones, then they are probably just molting. If it is a lot of feathers that aren't growing back very well (or not at all), then it could be something such as stress or illness.

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 2 months ago

      @ Bob Rat: They won't necessarily try to breed if they have no nesting box, but I can give you no guarantees on that. So, you may want to go with two of the same sex just to make absolutely sure that doesn't happen.

      As for the cat, unless you have a screened-in porch, you cannot prevent it from getting to the birds. Your best option to keep them safe is to place their cage in the house. (You also will have to battle bird mites if you place the cage outside.)

    • profile image

      Bob Rat 2 months ago

      I am looking at getting two budgies soon. If one was male and one female would they try to breed even if there was no nesting box. I don't want them to breed.

      Also sometimes a neighbor's cat comes into our yard. I will be keeping them outside. What should I do about that?

    • profile image

      Stevenmccarthy96@gmail.com 2 months ago

      I just love my little "angel" never ending fun !! My little buddy now over 2 years. were together all the time

      makes me laugh and smile everyday!!

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 3 months ago

      @ Erik Eastling: Your initial expense will depend, in large part, on where you live and from where you obtain your budgie and supplies. In U.S. dollars it will probably be somewhere in the range of $85--$110 (this would include one bird, a proper-sized cage, food, treat cup, branch-style perch, mineral treat, some basic toys, and a cage skirt--anything else is optional and can be added later). Of course, you can reduce your costs if you find a budgie that needs to be re-homed, or have a friend who has previously-used cage that is still in good shape.

    • profile image

      Erik Eastling 3 months ago

      Hoow expensive are budgiess initially?

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 3 months ago

      @ Renay: I wouldn't use random tree branches as you don't know what might be toxic to your budgies--budgies will chew on things! Also, there might be bird mites on anything you collect from your yard. That said, I would still recommend getting perches either made from safe tree branches, or those that are shaped like branches. These are much better than the plain dowel rods that come with the average cage. As for food, adding vitamins and minerals depends on whether the seed blend you are feeding already has these things added to it or not. I would ask the store or breeder from which you are getting the birds what brand of seed they are feeding. It may be better to at least start with that, for that is what the birds will be used to eating. (I have no experience with Trill to know its quality. I have used Vitakraft; Hagen and Kaytee also are good quality.) You should definitely supplement the birds' diet with fresh foods. Check the link under the "Life With Your New Pet" section to go to a web page that lists unsafe foods and plants to make sure you don't offer the bird anything toxic to it.

      I hope this helps answer your questions. Enjoy your new pets!

    • profile image

      Renay 3 months ago

      Hi I'm getting my first budgies tomorrow but I am totally confused by the endless results I found about how to look after your first Budgie and one person says use branches from a tree but the next site says don't do it. Feed them this no don't let them eat it. I knew about not using crap perches come with cage but can you please tell me definitely what to use and the best food. I've bought a packet of trill Budgie seed. Oh do I need to add recommend vitamins, oil, and in what form. Ie, powder and what one is the best. Thankyou and sorry for the questions

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 4 months ago

      @ Zahid Hasan: I am glad you found this article to be helpful. I would keep the budgies contained to one room if you let them out of the cage; that way you will always know where they are. Since budgies are very curious by nature, they could easily wander into trouble if allowed to wander freely. Unless you place the cage in a low spot where they can hop back into it, you will have to put them back in the cage yourself. A budgie with clipped wings cannot get enough lift to fly upwards. If you do notice over time that they seem to be able to fly up and for more than a few feet, that will be a good clue that their flight feathers are in need of a trim.

    • profile image

      Zahid Hasan 4 months ago

      I just got two parakeets and they are great so far. The first day they were quiet and now they are very chatty. I didn't know if I was supposed to let them out of the cage but since they are clipped, I am guessing it is fine inside the house. Will they come flying back to the cage afterward or how does it work? Lots of great tips provided here. Thank you.

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 4 months ago

      @ Joyce: Budgies really don't mind noise overall, as long as it isn't too loud or for too many hours. If it isn't difficult to move your bird's cage, you could possibly just place it in a quieter spot during the afternoon for a couple hours so he can have a rest. He will also need to be covered and have quiet at night; inadequate amounts of sleep can stress out your bird. So, if you stay up late, you may want to move his cage away from the TV by 8 or 9 p.m.

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 4 months ago

      @ Sup: Glad I could help you. Unfortunately, my advice here in the comments is limited to bird-keeping. Convincing your parents is up to you. :)

    • profile image

      Joyce 4 months ago

      I have only had my budgie for a couple of days and it is in a cage in the kitchen but would like to move it as the room is small. If I moved it to the living room close to the tv, which is on most of the day, would that be ok or would it be upsetting to the bird. My apt. is small so space is limited. You help would be greatly appreciated.

    • profile image

      Sup 4 months ago

      All of this information was very helpful! But, do any of you know how to convince parents to let you have a bird?

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 4 months ago

      @ carol townsend: Thank-you!

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 4 months ago

      @ Chelsea Meyer: You are welcome! If you ever have a question regarding your birds, please ask. Enjoy your little feathered friends. :)

    • profile image

      Chelsea Meyer 4 months ago

      Thank you so much, your article is very helpful and has helped me with my 2 budgies that were given to me after my husband passed. They are sure a treat to have in my life and now I know how to properly take care of them and to keep them healthy.

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 5 months ago

      @ Person: Yes, most budgies will forgive you for scaring them, though they may view you a bit warily until they realize you are not going scare them again. Give them a few days to calm, and then try slowly putting your hand in the cage. If they instantly panic, back away and give them another day or two. You talking to them softly by the side of the cage several times a day will go a long way in helping them learn to trust you.

      Yes, you ought to get their wings clipped if you plan on taking them out of the cage. If you aren't going to take them out, though, I wouldn't bother with it. As for where to get their wings clipped: most breeders can do that, as well as veterinarians who see pet birds. Some pet stores that specialize in pet birds also normally have someone who knows how to do that; whether they offer that as a service will depend on the shop, however.

    • profile image

      Person 5 months ago

      So, Hi! My family and I got 2 Budgies and they are very shy. We just got them today and Im wondering, since we knew nothing about Budgies an how to approach them until today, what happens if I accidentally scared them? Will they forgive me and learn to trust me or will it take longer? I just looked up how to approach them and did not know I had to let them get used to their environment and dived right in and ended up scaring them which made them flutter about in the cage.. Also, is getting their wings clipped a good idea? If so, where could we get them clipped and by who?

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 5 months ago

      @ Josephine: Unfortunately, budgies are just chatterboxes and will chirp a lot during the day, especially if you have more than one. You may want to find them a different place in the house so you don't hear them so much. Also, if you have the TV on frequently, they will chirp in response to the sounds coming from it. I hope you can find a solution that works for both you and them, as they are such great pets!

    • profile image

      Josephine 5 months ago

      Hi

      My neighbour gave away her 4 budgies with a Hugh cage to me. It's been 2 days now in my house , they crip a lot during the day and as soon as we go near the cage they stop crippling. Their cage is kept near the tv. Please help how to make them not to crip so much giving a headache. I love them and want to care for them.

      Josephine

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 5 months ago

      @ Lena: There is no guarantee that your budgie Jojo will even get along with a new bird, so you may want to consider the possibility of keeping them in separate cages and just allowing them to interact occasionally on a play gym. Jojo and the new bird could end up liking each other very much, however; If that happens, then the new bird would bond with him primarily instead of you. (This is not to say that if you tame it first it will suddenly stop liking you once you put it with Jojo. It will just prefer Jojo's company because they are both birds.) In the end you have to decide who you want your new pet to be best friends with: you or your other bird.

    • profile image

      Lena 5 months ago

      I have one male budgie, Jojo, who recently lost his mate Luna :( I'm looking at getting a new budgie as he has never been without a mate. However, I would really love this new budgie to be a good friend to me as well, eg very tame. I have two cages, a big one (which Jojo is currently in) and a smaller one. Before I introduce the new budgie to Jojo, should I tame it? If I then put it in with Jojo, will it stop wanting to be my friend?

      thanks for the great article! -Lena

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 7 months ago

      @ Tina.Mills: It sounds as if you may have to have his flight feathers trimmed if you want to be able to finger tame him. If he has had the freedom to fly around up to this point, then he will probably not be willing to be tamed unless you take away his ability to escape from you.

    • profile image

      Tina. Mills 7 months ago

      I've had my parakee for six months and he is wild chats in mirror Flys crazy through house but won't let me nearbhim

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 7 months ago

      @ rodolan: You could try running wire that is the same gauge as the type used on the cage in between the current bars, but this would be a large amount of work. That is the only way you could modify it; otherwise I would just suggest trying to return it. (If you do attempt to add wire, just make sure there are no sharp edges left from cutting it and that it does not have a coating that would harm the bird if it chewed on it. It needs to be a heavy gauge like what is used on a cage so that the bird cannot bend it.)

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 7 months ago

      @ Parakeet lover: Your bird is most likely a male. Young budgies have a bluish-lavender cere which changes to the appropriate color for their sex as they mature. Not knowing how old your bird is, my guess is simply based on your description. If the cere stays blue, you will know for certain. If it turns brown or tan, you have a female. Both sexes make good pets, however, so you will have a wonderful little friend regardless of what it turns out to be.

    • profile image

      rodolan 7 months ago

      Planning to purchase a parakeet. In ignorance, purchased a cage for cockatiels. Then learned the bar spacing is not right. Not sure I can return it. Is there any way to modify it?

    • profile image

      Parakeet lover 7 months ago

      I just got a budgie and I don't know what gender it is,it has a white,blue cere can someone help me?!

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 7 months ago

      @ Dennis Colley: The bird is still adjusting to you and his new environment. Once he has adjusted (takes normally around 2-3 weeks), he will not be so quiet or back away from you. You can start trying to finger tame him at the end of this week; just make sure you are in a room where there is nothing he could injure himself on, especially if his wings are not clipped. Finger taming is typically a slow process, but will be successful if you are patient and interact with him daily. Enjoy your pet. :)

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 8 months ago

      @ Person who needs help: Without knowing the exact circumstances of the day he suddenly became shy, I cannot say what caused your bird to become this way again. I can tell you, though, that the best thing to do is to just be patient and keep working with him. Bonding takes time, and you are still early into the process. Allow him room to breathe and don't push him too much with finger training, etc. You will want to be consistent with training (at least once a day, preferably around the same time), but you shouldn't rush him. He will come back around to liking you--he just need your affection in the meantime! :)

    • profile image

      Person who needs help 8 months ago

      Hello, I have gotten a budgie about 2 weeks ago. We had a very good relationship and I was extremely happy that my budgie had gotten used to me so fast! By day 4 he was extremely friendly, I could pet him and hand feed him, he was not finger trained though. But all the sudden he got really shy in only 2 days it was like when I bought him all over again! And there was no reason for it! So please give me help on why is this? Thank you (: sencerily person who needs help!

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 9 months ago

      @ Christina A: Standing on one foot is normal; he is just resting his feet.

      I am so glad to hear that your little friend has learned to love his new home and owner. Keep up the good work, it sounds as if you are taking good care of him. :)

    • profile image

      Christina A 9 months ago

      Hi there. Would you please explain why a budgie will stand on one foot? Thank you so much. Perky has turned out to be a very wonderful companion for me. Although he hasn't played with his beautiful play gym yet. He just recently started biting on one toy that has yarn. He recently changed and now he is looking into the mirror and pecking at it once in a while. I saw him bathing in his drinking water. He sings beautifully, when the television is on or Pandora radio, and loves to listen to children singing, the sounds of nature like ocean and birds., and he loves cartoons.

      I leave the cage open all day & only till dusk, then I cover him & put him in my bedroom so that he would sleep comfortably without all the light and sounds from the television. So far he can only get about 2 feet off the ground, but when he gets his flying wings I'm going to have them clipped, I believe that will make him a better companion, and I wont have to worry about him getting hurt., I love him too much to see that happen to him. He has the freedom to go in and out of his home as he pleases all day long. Plus he wants to be close to me, and nibbles on my shoe. He is happy and so am I!!!

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 9 months ago

      @ RosyKat: Budgies are just as friendly and easy to care for as doves. It is true, doves are quieter, but otherwise I would say they really hold no advantage over budgies as a good first pet bird. Quiet honestly, budgies are a lot more entertaining to watch! If you want to be sure the budgie you get is easy to train, simply get one from a breeder who hand-raises the chicks. A young budgie who has been handled by humans since it was tiny is less likely to shy away from its new owners (once it has become acclimated, that is).

    • profile image

      RosyKat 9 months ago

      Hello!

      I've been considering getting a bird for about a year now and recently decided on a Budgie. However, my family insists I get a dove instead as they feel they're easier to take care of, more friendly, and quieter. I was wondering which one you think would be a better choice for a new bird owner?

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 9 months ago

      @ Daisy: A bell toy that can be attached to the side of the cage near his perch would be a good start, since most budgies love bells. The toys shown in the pictures in the article would both be the sort of thing that would be easy for him to get to. Just think in terms of toys that can be placed on or near a perch he can reach, and you should find plenty of things. Also, if he likes to sit in the bottom of the cage, the little plastic lattice balls with bells inside would be a fun toy to stick down there.

    • profile image

      Daisy 9 months ago

      We just brought a rescued budgie home. He had been passed by several times because he had a broken wing. He seems very sweet but can not fly due to a previous injury and needs a smaller than normal cage. Can you give any advice on what kinds of toys would work better for a bird that has a hard time getting around in the cage.

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 9 months ago

      @ Heather: There really isn't anything you can do about that as long as her wings are not clipped. Budgies like to explore, so while she may really like you, she also wants to see all the interesting things in the room that she can't get to when she's in her cage. Even a budgie with clipped wings is likely to attempt to wander away from you when it's out; it's just easier to catch than a bird whose wings aren't clipped. That is why it's important to be in a room where there is nothing on which a budgie could easily injure itself if it got away from you (such as a running ceiling fan or a stove top where someone is cooking).

    • profile image

      Heather 9 months ago

      my parakeet likes to sit on my finger and her wings are not clipped,but she likes me but fly's away. what can i do so she does not fly away any more?

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 9 months ago

      @ Christina A: You are welcome. I would try one new toy at a time. Also, keep a couple of extra toys and rotate them with what is already in the cage. That way he will never become bored with his toys.

    • profile image

      Christina A 9 months ago

      I thank you so much for helping me and many other pet owners. I believe I am good to go now. Oh, should I limit the amount of toys so he could get used to one at a time, or just let it be.??? Thank you

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 9 months ago

      @ Christina A: You are correct; you just have to wait for him to warm up to his new toys. :) Budgies, being the prey of many things in the wild, have a built-in "Will this thing eat me?" response to anything new. Give him some time, and he will like it. As for staying on your finger, persistence is key. Do realize, however, that budgies are inquisitive, so he won't stay on your finger if he sees something he thinks he needs to investigate.

    • profile image

      Christina A 9 months ago

      I bought a wonderful play gym by Funtime Birdy, and Perky loves to sit on the top of the birch, but he wont play with any of the toys. I leave the door open with a ladder for him to go from the cage to the play gym and now he is just sitting on the ladder looking out of the cage. My question is Rhosynwen, will he eventually play with his toys? Or is there something I need to do, probably just wait. Also, he trusts me a lot, but he wont stay on my finger. Thank you so much for all the wonderful feedback!!!

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 10 months ago

      @ alaskagirl: Well, it sounds as if you are all set, then. If you do get a budgie, I hope you have years of fun with it. They are such great companions!

    • profile image

      alaskagirl 10 months ago

      Yea the bottom of the cage does come out. My dad will probably have stronger wire than the cage itself, he is a handy man. Thanks for the advice I will keep the cage away from my window or never open it. There is not much real need for it open any season anyway.

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 10 months ago

      @ alaskagirl: The budgie should be okay with a room in the 50-60 degree range; however, you need to make sure its cage does not sit in a draft (that would be worse than if the room is just chilly). Covering the cage at night will help it to not become too cold. As for the rabbit cage, I would say that it is not an ideal sort of thing to use. Unless your father has wire that is as strong as that which is already on the cage, you would have the risk of the bird being able to bend the extra wires and still get its head caught. Budgies are very curious, and they will sometime chew on their cage. Also, the type of wire typically used in the bottom of a rabbit cage would be the sort that a budgie could get its feet caught in. So you would have to remove the bottom wire altogether if there is any present.

      Pet store budgies can be just as friendly and trainable as a breeder-raised budgie, so that isn't a big deal. I would try to pick one that is still young (the cere will be lavender); the younger ones are usually easier to train.

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 10 months ago

      @ Christina A: Budgies will climb all over the sides of their cage, normally just to get from one point to another. Since your bird is still settling into his new environment, he is also probably doing this to explore every nook and cranny of his cage. Budgies are very inquisitive by nature, and it sounds as if that is all yours is up to--being a budgie!

    • profile image

      alaskagirl 10 months ago

      hi, I was also wondering if we could use an old rabbit cage instead of a budgie cage. I checked the dimensions they fit, but the gap the wire is 1 in. My dad can add more wire in between so it would only be 1/2 in. oh and we would buy a budgie from our local pet store because there are no breeders anywhere near our town. lol we live rural

    • profile image

      alaskagirl 10 months ago

      This article was very helpful, but I live in alaska and sometimes my room gets cold like mid 50s f. I want a budgie for my birthday and my parents are thinking about it. They will cave, my mom is very soft hearted. So will it be ok if the budgie is in a room that cold?

      Alaskagirl

    • profile image

      Christina A 10 months ago

      Yes it does, thank you. Something new just happened, I just got home and found Perky on the side of the cage, what does that mean?

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 10 months ago

      @ Christina A: You are welcome. I am glad to be able to help you!

      As for your questions:

      1. When Perky is content in his new home, you will know by the fact that he will play and twitter (and eventually chirp very loudly!) throughout the day. This is a good signal that he is ready to be handled and brought out of the cage.

      2. The easiest way to get him out of and back into the cage is to take the top piece off; the top is normally separate from the sides on most cages. That way you can pick him up off the perch, and place him back on it when your done, without trying to take him through the little door in the front. The goal is, of course, to cause him to enjoy his time with you outside the cage so much that he is eager to come out through the door when you place your hand inside the cage. If your cage does not have a separate top, you will have to work with going through the doorway. Teaching him to "step up" on your finger is helpful no matter how you have to take him out of the cage, by the way, as it helps avoid having to grab him unless it is absolutely necessary. The "step up" command can be taught to the bird without taking him out of his cage.

      3. Initially, Perky will have to be put back in his cage by you. There may come a time when he will be glad to "go home" of his own accord (provided that you leave the cage door open), but that probably won't happen right away. If you have to pick him up to get him back into his cage, gently hold him in your hand with his head between your first finger and your middle finger (curl these fingers downward). This provides you with a secure grip on him without the chance of you accidentally squeezing his neck/chest too hard.

      I hope this answers your questions. :)

    • profile image

      Christina A 10 months ago

      Rhosynwen: I thank you so much for all the wonderful information, comments, and the quick response to my question. The pet store where I adopted Perky my budgie said they will clip his /her feathers when it is time to do so. They have been clipped.

      1. How will I know if it is time to allow Perky to come out of the cage?

      For I don't want to stress him nor myself trying to get him back into the cage!!!

      2. What is the easiest way to get him to go into the cage?

      3. Will Perky go back into his home on his own???

      Thank you so much, and keep up the good work you are doing for all of us.

      God bless you and all that you are doing.

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 10 months ago

      @ Christina A: I would say once all their flight feathers have fully grown in. I cannot tell you exactly what week that happens, however, as I do not raise baby budgies. However, if you have never clipped a budgie's (parakeet's) wings before, please have someone such as an avian vet or bird breeder show you how. I cannot emphasize enough how important it is to learn from someone who really knows what they are doing. If you accidentally clip what is known as a "blood feather", you could cause your bird to bleed out. An experienced person can show you how to identify such feathers so you will not make this fatal error.

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 10 months ago

      @ Wendy: Persistently telling him "no" and putting your hand between your face and him when he does it would be the first step. Take him off your shoulder if he keeps trying after you tell him no. If he likes being on your shoulder, this will come across as discipline. If he tries again once you put him back on your shoulder, then simply place him back in his cage for a "time out". A few times of losing his privilege of being out should cure him of this. If that fails, though, you can try putting something he is allowed to chew on, such as a toy, between his beak and your face when he tries to bite. Being a young bird, he has to learn what is acceptable to bite/chew on, and what is not.

    • profile image

      Christina A 10 months ago

      At what age can you start clipping a parakeets wings safely???

    • profile image

      Wendy 10 months ago

      I have a young budgie, probably 3 mths old. He is happy, chirpy and loves to come out of his cage. He walks on me wanting to chew everything, but he bites me on the facel any suggestions please

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 10 months ago

      @ max: thank-you

    • profile image

      max 10 months ago

      i really like your article

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 10 months ago

      @ Summer: I am glad you found the article to be helpful. I am sorry to say that I do not know of any budgie breeders in Australia, as I am here in the United States. As for training, I know there are a few people on Youtube that have posted short videos about training budgies to do different tricks. You can check those out for a start. I will say that if you do get a budgie, you need to bond with it and have at least taught it to sit calmly on your hand before attempting to teach it tricks.

    • profile image

      Summer 10 months ago

      Hi, thank you for this articile. It had plenty of helpful infomation.

      I have always wanted to get a pet but my parents wouldn't agree to a dog but they said mabey to a budgie. So I was wondering if you had any useful tips on how to train a budgie to do tricks or a website I could go to to find out how. Also do you know of good budgie breeders and wing clipers in Dubbo, Mudgee Gulgon, Gerrie or Coolamon?

      Thanks agian ☺

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 10 months ago

      @ Nelly: You are welcome!

    • profile image

      Nelly 10 months ago

      Will do! Thank you so much for your help! I really appreciate it!

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 10 months ago

      @ Nelly: Your bird is probably rather scared after the whole incident you have described. I would watch him closely to make sure he does not show signs of illness after undergoing so much stress. If he does show signs of illness, or remains upset even after a week, you may want to take him to an avian vet to make sure he is okay (assuming you have one near you, that is).

      As for the oil, I can offer a suggestion with a disclaimer: you can try using some unscented, dye-free dish soap diluted with warm water (meaning mostly water with a bit of soap) to remove the oil from his feathers. Only put it on the area where the oil is, keep it away from his face, and rinse the spot very well with warm water. Allow him to dry out in a warm place so he doesn't get a chill. This should at least help remove the vegetable oil. Now, the disclaimer: I am not a veterinarian, so you can try cleaning him like this at your own risk. It shouldn't hurt him if you use the type of soap I have described, and make sure that none is left on his feathers so he won't ingest it. Again, though, I am not a vet, and make no guarantees on the effectiveness of this or even the complete safety of it.

      I hope your bird will be okay. :)

    • profile image

      Nelly 10 months ago

      My parakeet was flying through the house and got stuck on a sticky mouse pad. Immediately me and my sister put him in a shoe box and poured vegetable oil on the paper so that he can get unstuck. There wasn't much feathers on the pad, but there was oil on him still. Is it bad for the oil to be on his feathers? I tried to get rid of it by using warm water but not much came off. My bird is usually very playful yet feisty, but ever since that happened he stays in the corner of the cage next to his little mirror. His feathers also seem to be bonded together possibly from the oil (I can see his flesh) he always look wet at this point

      What should i do? Is he ok? Should I wait a few days and see what happens? He isn't interacting with the other bird much as normal.

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 10 months ago

      @ Jojo-kila: You are welcome!

    • profile image

      Jojo-kila 10 months ago

      Thank you for the response, will do as advised and observe. Also, Kila has developed Tail Bobing which is very slight and she sneezes/cough atleast once in a day and after drinking water. we have an appointment with the Vet for the follow-up and preventive feather mites treatment. Will discuss with vet on this too and see what the vet says. Thanks for your help mate.

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 10 months ago

      @ Jojo-kila: I think your birds are probably rather overwhelmed at this point. I would give them about a week to themselves to settle in before attempting to finger train them or take them out of the cage. So, other than occasionally speaking softly to them as you pass by or taking care of their cage and food, just leave them to themselves. Unless they show signs of illness, which would need to be addressed, they will be much happier with their new home once they have some time to adjust. After giving them this time, you can start putting your hand in their cage again, but go about things slowly. If you do not rush the bonding process, they will most likely reward you with affectionate trust in the end. Enjoy your pets. :)

    • profile image

      Jojo-kila 11 months ago

      Hi Rhosynwen, we got a pair(Jojo and Kila) of Budgies last week. Few things we have done unknowingly - brought the bird to home in their new cage without covering, 3/4th day tried to feed both with hands in the cage, noticed they were suffering with diarrhea and took them to the Vet and they are still on antibiotics, changed the cage to a more safer and bigger one and moved them to this cage the same day. After all this few observations we have made - Jojo doesn't like my hand in the cage and flies away, Kila is the female and tried to avoid sitting on hand but with little effort she steps-up and quickly goes to nearest perch or swing. have left both birds outside in the first week thinking they will get adjusted to new environment and were just flying around and few times hitting the wall with wings. At the moment they are on Seed diet and they do not touch millet even left in the cage. Hope we have not done too many thing too soon and made birds un-tamable. All though Jojo is playfull chirps occasionally when no one is around and tries to bite the cage wires but Kila is sitting in one place and not that playfull and most times will be perching on one leg, this worries me. can you help?

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 11 months ago

      @ Ella Mohler: I would definitely wait at least a week to get a budgie if you have just had the room painted. If oil-based paint was used at all (such as on the door frame or window casing), I would wait 10 days. Paint fumes are definitely not good for a budgie, and oil-based paint gives off heavier fumes than latex-based paint does.

    • profile image

      Ella Mohler 11 months ago

      Its very cool that to find an article 5 years old and you still comment on it! Quite rare. Im getting a budgie once my room is being done painted. I was wondering should i wait more then 2 days or more to get a budgie once painting is done & dried. Would the paint fumes be a danger to the budgie? If so how long do I have to wait?

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 11 months ago

      @ Ahmet Karatas: I will try to answer your questions as best as I can.

      Q. #1 and 2: I have never bred budgies, so my knowledge on that subject is limited. Thus, I cannot say much on these two questions, other than that your budgies will have to be a few months old for them to breed, as they do not reach maturity until 6-9 months of age.

      Q. #3: It is fine if the cockatiels' cage and budgies' cage are in the same room. You may want to give your budgies a few days to become used to their new home before putting them near the other birds, however. (This is also to ensure that the new birds are not carrying any illness that might infect your cockatiels.)

      Q. #4: Budgies are normally fine with giving themselves a bath. All you need to do is give them a shallow dish of water once in a while. If they need to bathe, they will. Don't worry if they are not in the mood to do so (they do not need this as often as a cockatiel does). Just make sure they are not in a draft when bathing and drying.

      Q. #5: Without knowing exactly what you bought, I could not say. Just follow the directions on the bottle and keep it out of the birds' eyes/face.

      Q. #6: Yes, all colors of budgies can breed with one another.

      Q. #7: I would not suggest you get branches from a park, only because some plants can be toxic to birds if they chew on them. You do not always know what kind of branch you are picking up, and whether it would negatively affect your bird. Plus, you could potentially introduce mites into your birds' cages.

      I hope you this helps. Enjoy your new birds!

    • profile image

      Ahmet Karatas 11 months ago

      Hey, i had a few questions. 1. What is the youngest age i can breed my budgies. 2. Is it okay if my budgies son breeds with my budgies daughter? 3. I have cockatiels near my living room, can I put my 2 budgies (in the same cage) near them or should I put them somewhere that the cockatiels can't see but can hear. 4. If my new budgies aren't tamed, how long should I wait to bathe it. 5. I got a spray to keep insects away from my cockatiel, how do I use it and how often? 6. Do green budgies breed with blue budgies? 7. Is it okay to get branches from the park and place it in the cage as a perch, if yes, do I need to wash it? Sorry about the load, I just needed a few answers before I purchased my new budgies

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 12 months ago

      @ Sonia: I am glad you found the article helpful. It sounds as though your birds are rather tame already. I would keep working on the finger training with them. Just keep it slow and gentle, and in short sessions (10-15 min.), until they are completely comfortable with being handled. Your sister is correct; budgies would much rather sit on your finger or shoulder than be held in your hand. So, to make training and bonding more pleasant for them (and your fingers), stay with teaching them to "step up" on your finger. When you do let them out, try to do so in a small room where they are less likely to injure themselves on something if they get away from you.

      It does not sound as if Cloud has any sort of serious issue. As long he is eating and drinking properly, has regular-looking droppings, and no breathing problems (some of the signs of budgie illness), I would say he is probably all right. If he is preening a lot, there's a chance his skin is dry. To give him a bath, put lukewarm water in a shallow dish, and place the dish in the bottom of the cage. The birds will bathe themselves on their own--if they feel like doing so, that is. Don't worry about it if they are not in the mood; just try again another day. Also, make sure they are not in a draft while they dry after a bath. (I would add that perhaps Cloud could also be responding to the presence of a draft going by the cage periodically. I would check to make sure that is not the case. If it is, you may need to move the cage.)

      As for nesting: I never got into the breeding end of things with budgies, so while I think that not having a nest box is all you would need to do to keep them from breeding, I cannot tell you for certain (sorry). Since your budgies will not mature for at least another 3-6 months, there is a chance you will not have to worry yourself over the birds trying to breed, as they could both end up being of the same sex.

      Have fun with your pets!

    • profile image

      Sonia 12 months ago

      Hi, a brilliant hub of information. I got my 2 daughters a budgie each for one of their birthdays. They were 10weeks old approx and we got them a week ago, cloud is easier to handle & confident, yet sky will perch on your finger in the cage. I've let them out once & it was both scary & hilarious, kept bumping in to things or running away. Anyway, Cloud seems to be always grooming & puffing his feathers up, I was reading other comments & wondered is this cause for concern or not, he does it regularly through the day more than sky.. Also the petshop guy told me to pick them up after they've settled in to get used to being handled, they eventually let me catch them but peck a little whilst being held, they don't seem especially anxious just mildly fussed they can't open their wings, is this okay or not as my sister said never hold them that way, they don't like it, I was also told if you have a male & female they don't breed unless there is a nesting box, is that correct? Kind regards xx

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 12 months ago

      @ Arun: You basically have a choice to either clip their wings (at least partially) so you can let them out to play without them getting hurt, or keep their wings natural and buy a much larger cage. I personally would not keep four budgies in a cage that size unless I intended to allow them time to play outside their cage every day. You must also give them time to adjust to their new home with you; it takes most pet birds two or three weeks to truly settle into their new environment. Do not worry about bathing them, either. They will be perfectly happy to bathe themselves in a shallow dish of water placed in their cage now and then (budgies do not need to bathe as often as some other types of birds).

      As for letting them loose outside: I would not do that. They are domesticated, and while there is a small chance they would make it on their own, it is more likely they would just be eaten by something or not find enough food. Give them some time to earn your trust, and they will be happy to come out of their cage without hesitating (and will also go back without a fight). Enjoy your new pets!

    • profile image

      Arun 12 months ago

      Hello... I am a first time bird owner and have 4 budgies 2 yellow and 2 blue. Bought them 5 days ago since my 5 year old was enamoured with them. Moreover wanted them to have adequate company. Have a cage which is approx 2' x 1 1/2' x 2' since the shopkeeper said it would be adequate for them. Tried giving them some fly time in the bathroom which is quite spacious. However they wouldn't come out of their cage at first. Committed the mistake of pulling them out of their cage since they were fluttering around like crazy. Once out, they wouldn't go back in. Had a tough time recovering them back and depositing them back in their cage. Noticed that they often flew and collided with the bathroom mirror while trying to evade my hands. In the process got bit a couple of times by them too. Am afraid that my rough handling may have injured them too. Although there are no signs of injury yet their body seemed to be too tender. Am afraid to give them flying time since I wouldn't like to hurt them. Do not wish to clip their wings since I don't think it is natural for them. Am at wits end on giving them a bath in the future. Am located at a remote area in India and do not have access to a bird vet here. Would just like the birds to be happy chirping naturally and my son to be happy taking care of them. Am contemplating releasing them out so as to lead their lives in a natural habitat. But have second thoughts that at least I can take care of them . Please advise

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 12 months ago

      @ Beka: Since you have only had the birds a few days, they are still trying to figure out if they can trust you. Though budgies tend to bond better with their people when kept alone, I would not separate them just yet. It may be that they will both enjoy playing with you when they are out, and you will not have to keep them in different cages. Give them at least two, and maybe three weeks, to adjust to life with you before making that decision. It normally takes a while for birds to bond with you and to be fully finger-trained anyway (unless they were raised by hand). Go slowly and gently with your training, and in time you will have two buddies for life!

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 12 months ago

      @ Sophie: While it could be a an allergic reaction to either something you are cleaning the cage with or something (such as lotion or perfume) on your hands when you handle him, I cannot guarantee that this is merely the problem. The fact that it is on only one foot makes me wonder. Personally, I would take him to the vet if he is still having this problem. (A note about the possible allergic reaction: always be careful to handle the bird without anything such as lotion on your hands. What doesn't bother people can irritate a bird's feet. Also, if you are not already doing this, make sure to clean his cage with a mild dish soap that has no dyes or perfumes in it.)

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 12 months ago

      @ Claire: I'm sorry I am just now getting back to you. While every budgie possess a slightly different temperament, I can safely say that no budgie is fond of change. When a budgie loses its cagemate, it can be sad for quite some time, and resent any newcomers you try to introduce. Time and patience are the only things that can help a budgie adjust to changes.

      Finger training is a process, and some birds simply take longer to learn than others (especially if the bird is older). I would suggest concentrating on finger training the new one for now, and let the other bird just get used to his new buddy. Once your older bird is comfortable with the new bird, I believe he will be more receptive to interacting with you (I think he is, in essence, a bit overwhelmed with all the changes of the past few months).

    • profile image

      Beka 12 months ago

      I have two budgies so cute they sing all day in the sun and when I put them on the floor they just don't move they only eat and climb a bit and when I put my hand in the cage they move quietly and when I approach my hand they fly like crazy but one of them once ate from my hand. I'm so worried coz I want to separate them so I can make them be more comfortable with me but I don't know how to .i just bought them like 4 days ago , pleases help

    • profile image

      Sophie 12 months ago

      I have another question about my budgie, the same one noted in the question 2 months ago. I often see him worrying and scratching at his right foot around his ankle and between his toes. My sister says she saw little plaques of white and pink skin and something that looks like tiny blisters, but I'm hesitating on going to see a vet just yet. I keep his cage impeccably clean though it's hard to clean the perches because he has favorite "comfort perches" that he doesn't leave for nothing. Other than that, there is no visible problem. Any guesses at the cause of this?

    • profile image

      Claire 13 months ago

      Hi, I'm Claire I am the one that takes the most care of my parakeets in my family. Just last year my first parakeet passed away. She had a companion late in life and since she passed away my other bird has not acted the same. These differences range from the timidness he shows when I have him out playing to the skittishness he displays while I may be just walking around his cage. Do you know how I can fix that? Oh and while I'm writing, I have another question. Following my other bird passing away I recently bought a much younger bird and the other bird (mentioned previously) he has never taken to the new bird. I feel as if I'm getting no where with finger training. Seeing how I had to start over with the whole trust factor with both birds. Hope you can provide some insight on my issues.

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 14 months ago

      @ The Penguin Girl: I am glad you found this article to be helpful. I hope you enjoy your bird when you get it. :)

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 14 months ago

      @ Loulou: I'm happy to have been a help to you. I am not a breeder, so I would go with whatever the breeder you know told you. As for the dogs, it really depends on whether they have been around pet birds before. If they have not, there's a good chance that they will just view the bird as something to chase. I would not risk letting the bird out of the cage in the same room where the dogs are in that case.

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 14 months ago

      @ Ana: I am glad you found the information in my article to be helpful. Unfortunately, I don't dispense advice on convincing parents to do something. :) I can say that if you cannot have an outdoor aviary, your budgie will still be happy to be with you in the house. Unless you get a bird that was raised in an outdoor aviary, he won't know the difference.

    • profile image

      The Penguin Girl 14 months ago

      I'm interested in having a pet budgie and wanted my parents know that I will care for my pet when I get one. Im getting one soon and wanted to know how to properly care for it and keep it safe. Your article prooved everything I need to know and I already feel connected to my future pet even though I dont have one yet!

    • profile image

      Loulou 14 months ago

      What is the best age to get a baby? A breeder I know has told me 7 weeks.

      Also we have 2 dogs - any chance they will get along?

      Love your info. Thank you!! Best I have found.

    • profile image

      Ana 14 months ago

      Hi! This is very helpful, THANK YOU! Finally a really good website on budgies. I live in Australia and I've had budgies before. One was mine and my sis had two, though she is the one who let them fly away. My sisters budgies flew away but mine got sick after about a year or so. There weren't any avian vets though so sadly, she passed. But I'm hoping to get a male this time, try teach it to speak coz I have SO much spare time. Here's the (part info part question) thing, all the conditions outside are perfect. I'd really like to have a small aviary, maybe on my backyard balcony, just for the one budgie. It'll be a part time thing probably every day once it's used to the house. I'll have some Eucalyptus or gum branches and enough room to fly. But I have to convince my mum. Any tips? The shops around here have cheap aviaries and we have all the materials to build our own anyway, but she still won't agree. Idc what it looks like, just that it's good for the budgie. If you can, please give me some tips on how to convince my parents.

      Thx

      -Ana

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 14 months ago

      @ Iftakhar Shawon: I guess it depends on how these new budgies were housed by your friends. If all four of them were in the same cage together, I would keep it that way. If they were put in two cages as pairs, I would leave them that way. I would not, however, split up the ones that are used to being with each other. So, in my opinion, your options are to either use three cages, or put them all in one cage (only do this if the four from your friends were originally all together). If you mix your young budgies with the older ones, just watch them to make sure none of the older birds peck at them and such. Sometimes older birds will try to dominate younger ones, and you do not want any of them to get hurt.

    • Iftakhar Shawon profile image

      Iftakhar Shawon 14 months ago

      I had 2 young Budgerigar. Yesterday I've collect another 2 pair Budge from my friends. those 02 pair r adult. I've 3 cage but I've putted them 2 cage 3:3.... the reason is my previous Budge is very much playful & eat well, so that new budge will play & habituate with new food & place.

      my Question is, is this right way... actually what i want?

      or..... should i put them in 3 cage with their pair?

      or put them all in one cage for one month?

      Regards

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 15 months ago

      @ Sophie: Don't fret, your bird is acting just as most any other budgie would in a new environment. He has to make sure everything is okay in this strange new place before he lets down his guard and settles in. If he is still nervous and not eating much after a week, then you may need to be concerned. (I will note that he may not eat in front of you for a while. The surest way to know whether he is eating or not is to check his seed dish for seed hulls. If there are hulls, then he's eating, even if you didn't see him.) It will take him a good two or three weeks to really become comfortable with both you and his cage. Just keep talking softly to him to let him know you are his friend. Enjoy your pet. :)

    • Rhosynwen profile image
      Author

      Rhosynwen 15 months ago

      @Mickji: Well, as I said on another reply, your birds may never be the type that love to interact with you. Some of them are like that, just as some budgies learn to talk and others don't. I would simply enjoy them as they are for now. Who knows, maybe one day one or both of them will surprise you by crawling onto your hand.

    • Mickji profile image

      Mickji 15 months ago from between Italy and Switzerland, travelling around the world thanks to a little special object

      Yes I take them out of the cage everyday. I also try to take them with me while walking.They mostly hide in the hat. At home they always have the door of the cage open. But they always jump away and run from my hands. If I only keep one, it scream and call the other as if it has to say farewell...