A–Z List of Houseplants That Are Poisonous to Your Cats - PetHelpful - By fellow animal lovers and experts
Updated date:

A–Z List of Houseplants That Are Poisonous to Your Cats

Cindy is a conscientious cat mom who loves sharing pet expertise with others through writing.

Many common houseplants can be poisonous to cats. Learn which ones to avoid to keep your pets safe.

Many common houseplants can be poisonous to cats. Learn which ones to avoid to keep your pets safe.

What Plants Are Toxic to Cats?

Many pet owners keep common plants in their homes without realising that they are poisonous to cats. Not all of them will prove fatal if chewed or eaten, but some most definitely can kill your much-loved feline friend. Never assume a cat will instinctively try not to eat a poisonous plant—all too often, cats end up being rushed to the vet suffering from poisoning as a direct result of chewing on or eating toxic houseplants.

In this article, I hope to list many of the most common plants that pose health risks to cats so that you can ensure you don't bring them into your home. If you already have any of these in your home, it may be a good idea to remove them. Many of these species are commonly kept as houseplants, so I am guessing that some will come as surprises to unsuspecting cat owners.

Aloe Vera

  • Common names: Aloe
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, depression, diarrhea, anorexia, tremors, change in urine color

Amaryllis

  • Common names: Belladonna lily, Saint Joseph lily, cape belladonna, naked lady
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, depression, diarrhea, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, anorexia, tremors

Arum Lily

  • Common names: Calla lily, pig lily, white arum, trumpet lily, florist's calla, and garden calla
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Oral irritation; intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips; excessive drooling; vomiting; difficulty swallowing

Asian Lily

  • Common names: Asiatic lily
  • Toxic to: Cats
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, death

Asparagus Fern

  • Common names: Asparagus, emerald feather, emerald fern, Sprenger's fern, plumosa fern, lace fern, racemose asparagus, shatavari
  • Toxic to: Cats and dogs
  • Symptoms: Allergic dermatitis with repeated dermal exposure (berry ingestion could result in gastric upset, including vomiting, abdominal pain, or diarrhea)

Azalea

  • Common names: Rosebay, rhododendron
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses.
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, hypotension, CNS depression, cardiovascular collapse, death

Baby's Breath

  • Common names: Maiden's breath
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea

Barbados Lily

  • Common names: Amaryllis, fire lily, lily of the palace, ridderstjerne
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, salvation, diarrhea (large quantities can cause convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors and cardiac arrhythmias)
  • Note: The bulbs are the most poisonous part of this plant.

Begonia

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Oral irritation; intense burning of mouth, tongue and lips; excessive drooling; vomiting; difficulty swallowing
  • Note: The tubers are the most toxic part of the plant.

Bird of Paradise Flower

  • Common names: Crane flower, bird's tongue flower
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: mild nausea, vomiting, drowsiness
  • Note: Poisoning is caused mainly by the fruit and seeds. This species should not be confused with Caesalpinia or Poinciana gilliesii, both of which are also known as bird of paradise and are more toxic.

Branching Ivy

  • Common names: English ivy, glacier ivy, needlepoint ivy, sweetheart ivy, California ivy
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, diarrhea
  • Note: The foliage is more toxic than the berries.

Caladium

  • Common names: Malanga, elephant's ear, stoplight, seagull, mother-in-law plant, pink cloud, Texas wonder, angel wing, exposition, candidum, fancy-leaved caladium
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Oral irritation; intense burning of mouth, tongue and lips; excessive drooling; vomiting; difficulty swallowing

Cardboard Palm

  • Common names: Cycad, zamia
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, melena, icterus, increased thirst, hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, bruising, coagulopathy, liver damage, liver failure, death

Carnation

  • Common names: Pink, wild carnation, sweet William
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Mild gastrointestinal discomfort, mild dermatitis

Ceriman

  • Common names: Swiss cheese plant, cut-leaf philodendron, hurricane plant, Mexican breadfruit
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Oral irritation; intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips; excessive drooling; vomiting; difficulty swallowing

Charming Dieffenbachia

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Oral irritation; intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips; excessive drooling; vomiting; difficulty swallowing

Chinese Jade

  • Common names: Silver jade plant, silver dollar
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Nausea, retching

Chrysanthemum

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, hypersalivation, incoordination, dermatitis

Clivia Lily

  • Common names: Clivy, caffre lily, cape clivia, klivia
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, salvation, diarrhea; large ingestions cause convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors, cardiac arrhythmias
  • Note: The bulbs are the most poisonous part of the plant.

Coleus

  • Common names: Indian borage, bread and butter plant, Spanish thyme, East Indian thyme, stinging thyme, country boarage
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea (occasionally bloody), depression, anorexia.

Corn Plant

  • Common names: Cornstalk plant, dracaena, dragon tree, ribbon plant
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: vomiting (occasionally with blood), depression, anorexia, hypersalivation, dilated pupils (in cats)

Cyclamen

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Salivation, vomiting, diarrhea
  • Note: Following the ingestion of large amounts of tubers, heart rhythm abnormalities, seizures and death may occur.

Daffodil

  • Common names: Narcissus, jonquil, paper white
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, salvation, diarrhea, low blood pressure, convulsions (when consumed in large amounts), tremors, cardiac arrhythmias
  • Note: The bulbs are the most poisonous part of the plant.

Dahlia

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Mild gastrointestinal signs, mild dermatitis

Desert Azalea

  • Common names: Desert rose, mock azalea, Sabi star, impala lily, kudu lily
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, depression, irregular heart beat, death

Devils Ivy

  • Common names: Pothos, golden pothos, taro vine, ivy arum
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Oral irritation: intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips; excessive drooling; vomiting; difficulty swallowing

Dieffenbachia

  • Common names: Charming dieffenbachia, giant dumb cane, tropic snow, dumbcane, exotica, spotted dumb cane, exotica perfection
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Oral irritation; intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips; excessive drooling; vomiting; difficulty swallowing

Easter Lily

  • Toxic to: Cats
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, death

Everlasting Pea

  • Common names: Sweet pea, perennial pea
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Weakness, lethargy, pacing, head pressing, tremors, seizures, death

Fig

  • Common names: Weeping fig, Indian rubber plant
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms (ingestion): Oral irritation, salivation, vomiting
  • Symptoms (contact with skin): Dermatitis

Flamingo Flower

  • Common names: Flamingo lily, tail flower, oilcloth flower, pigtail plant, painter's pallet
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Oral irritation; intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips; excessive drooling; vomiting; difficulty swallowing

Florida Beauty

  • Common names: Gold dust dracaena and spotted dracaena
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms (cats): Dilated pupils, breathing difficulty, abdominal pain, increased heart rate, drooling
  • Symptoms (cats and dogs): Vomiting, depression, inappetence, drooling, incoordination, weakness

Garden Hyacinth

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, dermatitis, allergic reactions
  • Note: The bulbs are the most toxic part of the plant.

Giant Dracaena

  • Common names: Palm lily, grass palm
  • Toxic to: Cats
  • Symptoms: Vomiting (occasionally with blood), depression, anorexia, hypersalivation, dilated pupils

Gladiola

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Salivation, vomiting, drooling, lethargy, diarrhea
  • Note: The bulbs (corms) are the most toxic part of the plant.

Hellebore

  • Common names: Christmas rose, Lenten rose, Easter rose
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Drooling, abdominal pain, diarrhea, colic, depression

Hosta

  • Common names: Plantain lily, funkia
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, depression

Indian Hemp

  • Common names: Marijuana, hashish
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Prolonged depression, vomiting, incoordination, sleepiness or excitation, hypersalivation, dilated pupils, low blood pressure, low body temperature, seizure, coma, death (rare)
Jade

Jade

Jade Plant

  • Common names: Baby jade, dwarf rubber plant, jade tree, Chinese rubber plant, Japanese rubber plant
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, depression, ataxia, slow heart rate (rare)
Kiss-Me-Quick

Kiss-Me-Quick

Kiss-Me-Quick

  • Common names: Yesterday, today, tomorrow, lady-of-the-night, morning-noon-and-night, Franciscan rain tree
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Tremors, seizures (for several days), diarrhea, vomiting, hypersalivation, lethargy, incoordination, coughing

Lacy Tree Philodendron

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Oral irritation; intense burning and irritation of mouth, lips, tongue; excessive drooling; vomiting; difficulty swallowing

Lily

  • Toxic to: Cats
  • Symptoms: Kidney failure

Lily of the Valley

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, irregular heartbeat, low blood pressure, disorientation, coma, seizure
Mistletoe

Mistletoe

Mistletoe

  • Common names: American mistletoe
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Gastrointestinal disorders, cardiovascular collapse, dyspnea, bradycardia, erratic behavior, vomiting, diarrhea, low blood pressure (rare)
  • Note: This plant is hallucinogenic in humans.
Nephthytis

Nephthytis

Nephthytis

  • Common names: Arrowhead Vine, green gold naphthysis, African evergreen, trileaf wonder
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Oral irritation; intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips; excessive drooling; vomiting; difficulty swallowing

Orange

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, depression, potential photosensitivity

Orange Day Lily

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, death (rare)

Pencil Cactus

  • Common names: Crown of thorns
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Irritation to the mouth and stomach (sometimes causing vomiting)
  • Note: This plant is often overrated in its toxicity.

Poinsettia

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Irritation to the mouth and stomach (sometimes causing vomiting)
  • Note: This plant is often overrated in its toxicity.

Primrose

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Mild vomiting

Spring Parsley

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Photosensitization (ulcerative and exudative dermatitis), ocular toxicity

Stargazer Lily

  • Toxic to: Cats
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, death (rare)

Sweetheart Ivy

  • Common names: English ivy, glacier ivy, needlepoint ivy, branching ivy, California ivy
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, diarrhea
  • Note: The foliage is more toxic than the berries

Taro

  • Common names: Caladium, elephant ear, pai, ape, cape, via, via sori, malanga
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Oral irritation; intense burning and irritation of the mouth, lips and tongue; excessive drooling; vomiting; difficulty swallowing

Tiger Lily

  • Toxic to: Cats
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, death

Tomato

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Hypersalivation, inappetence, severe gastrointestinal upset, diarrhea, drowsiness, CNS depression, confusion, behavioral change, weakness, dilated pupils, slow heart rate

Trumpet Lily

  • Common names: Calla lily, pig lily, white arum, arum lily, florist's calla, garden calla, arum lily
  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs
  • Symptoms: Oral irritation; intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips; excessive drooling; vomiting; difficulty swallowing

Tulip

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, depression, diarrhea, hypersalivation
  • Note: The highest concentration of toxin is in the bulbs.

Water Hyacinth

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, anorexia

Wood Lily

  • Toxic to: Cats
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, death (rare)

Yucca

  • Toxic to: Cats, dogs, horses
  • Symptoms (dogs and cats): Vomiting, diarrhea
  • Symptoms (horses and grazing animals): Liver disease, secondary photosensitivity

Useful Links

This article is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge. It is not meant to substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, or formal and individualized advice from a veterinary medical professional. Animals exhibiting signs and symptoms of distress should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.

Questions & Answers

Question: Are Christmas cacti poisonous to cats?

Answer: No, fortunately, these are nontoxic to both dogs and cats.

Comments

Carolyn on November 17, 2019:

Hi, I want to bring in my alternanthera inside for winter, will it harm my cats? Thanks

Tanya on October 20, 2019:

I also wish to know if Butterfly Pea (tea, blooms, leaves, etc.) is toxic to cats?

Melissa on October 19, 2019:

Hello,I was just wondering I have a little over a year old cat and believe she may have chewed on my mother n law plant because she has been throwing up off and on all day but the last time was 3 hours age and before that 10 hours.i seen where the mother n law plant was poison and so removed in from the house.its more like clear liquid to just milky color.do you think she has got to much or just enough to make her feel bad?I know throwing up isn't good but could she have got the poison out of her before it cause any harm?I don't want to wait to long to get her to the vet.we change her litter box to day and she had diarrhea but that's the only time.hope you can ease my mind.thank you

Dawn on October 06, 2019:

are mother inlaw or snake plant dangerous to cats

Butterfly Pea on July 01, 2019:

Is Buttfly Pea (tea, blooms, leaves, etc) toxic to cats?

Dani on June 09, 2019:

Thank you! This list is very clear and helpful.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on March 04, 2019:

If only I had the time to research that article too Dori, but there would no doubt be thousands of plants and in recent times I have a lot of other stuff going on in my life that doesn’t allow me much time for writing any more.

Dori on March 03, 2019:

Thank you for answering which plants are poisonous to cats. A better question would be what are the plants NOT poisonous to cats.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on February 17, 2019:

I’m pleased this helped you HERBWOMAN7125

HERBWOMAN7125 on February 17, 2019:

Your article on plants toxic to cats was very helpful. After stargazing lillies almost killing my daughter's kitten, I googled your article and found several plants I need to remove from my home. I just adopted two more rescue cats recently. Thank you for your research.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on February 03, 2019:

Hi Melanie

I am inclined to agree with you re Marijuana, although looking at the symptoms they are indicative of an animal that has consumed too much of it, hence the sleepiness, vomiting etc. In small amounts I am certain it can be very beneficial for various medical conditions.

Melanie on February 03, 2019:

As far as marijuana (hemp) is concerned - there results of animals being treated for a variety of ailments using hemp oil has been remarkable - animals have been known to eat marijuana and it hasnt been toxic to them

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on January 28, 2019:

I’m afraid not Jan, I would avoid letting your cats too near to them.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/geraniums-poisonous-...

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on October 27, 2018:

PS. Lucy, I do realise that you didn’t mean the actual sweets by the way, but I suspect the main problem with the plant would be the root, and then only if your cat had too much of it.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on October 27, 2018:

Hi Lucy

I think this may help:

Liquorice (Glycyrrhizin)

Natural liquorice derived from liquorice root contains glycyrrhizin. It is this compound which makes liquorice sweet. Surprisingly, even humans can overdose on liquorice!

The excess consumption of liquorice can cause liver damage, raise blood pressure and cause muscle weakness.

Again, this is one where an occasional, small amount of consumption is probably not going to be a concern, but if your pet has consumed a whole bag of liquorice it might be worth contacting your vet.

Lucy on October 27, 2018:

Is licorice plant toxic to cats?

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on August 12, 2018:

Thank you for the lovely comment Savanna

Savanna H on August 12, 2018:

This is really helpful, all the pictures make it easy to know the plants! Thanks.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on July 04, 2018:

Hi ‘Worried’, in your position I would be very concerned too, mainly because of the Peruvian Lilies, which I suspect will have the same problem as other lilies to cats. Keep searching for her and if she seems even remotely unwell when you find her, get her to a vet as soon as possible. Good luck.

Worried on July 04, 2018:

My boyfriend sent me flowers and when I came home from work after an hour I noticed my female cat missing. Throughout my search for her I noticed some chewed off flower heads and an entry into the wall open. I immediately check the website to confirm flowers in the arrangement. The flowers the florist listed are lavender roses, purple stock, lavender Peruvian Lillie’s, purple statice, lush greens. My fear is she is poisoned are any of these poisoness? She will not answer my call

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on March 01, 2018:

Thank you Neely :)

Neely on March 01, 2018:

good site good site thanks for the pictures since I do not know the names of my house plants

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on January 24, 2018:

Sorry to hear this happened to your cats Carmen, but thank you for sharing your story so others can realise how serious the risk is to their cats and the ongoing costs it can incur if they are lucky enough to survive.

Carmen on January 23, 2018:

I have two indoor cats (not related) both chewed on a large house plant of the Lily family. Now, both cats have kidney disease, are on special food and daily oral medication. Take note of the plants that will harm your pets.... as much as I love my cats... it costs $160 + medication a month. Once a year blood work and urine tests for the two about $400 each.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on January 28, 2017:

So sorry for your loss Jake. I can only say that the general consensus based on cases has caused the Poinsettia to be listed as overrated in its toxicity. The sad thing is that not every cat will react the same to the toxins, so the overall scientific conclusions are based on the majority, not the minority of cases. It sounds like tragically your cat had a particularly bad reaction to the toxins, so is the exception to the rule.

jakeadoodle1975@yahoo.com on January 28, 2017:

My cat died very quickly from eating a poinsettia leaf. I even tried to give him CPR but he was gone in 5 minutes. How is it you list it as "generally over rated in toxicity?"

Nora on November 25, 2016:

Greetings. I was just wondering if Boston Fern is toxic to cats. It looks a lot like an Asparagus Fern. My cat has been chewing on it but she seems to b ok. Thanks for any information

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on January 20, 2016:

Sounds like you were lucky this time Deb. Maybe they weren't big enough to do her any noticeable harm due to lack of volume of foliage and stem consumed.

deb on January 20, 2016:

my cat ate 3 tomato plants, leaves and stems,

and didn't even slow her down

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on November 13, 2014:

I would advise you to err on the side of caution Heather and get rid of any house plants just in case. I can't comment on the purple passion and the African mask as I am not familiar with them.

Heather on November 13, 2014:

Hello, i am thinking about getting a cat and i realized i have poisonous plants like philodenrons, pathos, asparagus fern, arrowhead, aloe. Would i have to get rid of these plants? Also is a spilt leaf, purple passion and an african mask poisonous to cats?

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on January 19, 2014:

Hi shebacat, the title of this hub is A-Z of Houseplants that are Poisonous to your Cats. The key is in the word 'Houseplants' as these are the ones your bored cat is most likely to come into contact with or even chew on them. In the garden they are probably more interested in chasing mice, birds etc than they are in chewing on random plants (which is not to say they won't, only that it is less likely than in the house).

shebacat on January 19, 2014:

How can one even plan a garden if all these plants are poisonous? I'm sure I have had several plants for ages that are but my cat hasn't suffered. I agree about lilies but surely most cats are not out there eating plants all the timer.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on November 06, 2013:

I hope Ginger will be okay. So long as there was no pollen on the leaves she should be hopefully. It is the lily pollen that is dangerous. Good luck.

Lisa Fucci from Boston, Massachusetts on November 06, 2013:

I am enraged at the fact that florists and other retailers do not have to label flowers as toxic to pets and children. Pet owners should get together and fight for change. I would be more than happy to start a petition (with supporters)to make this happen. My ginger ate some of the leaves in a Lilly assorted arrangement i was frightened to learn that she might die from this. Hopefully we caught it in time with induced vomiting and charcoal. She will be hydrated for the next three days. Needless to say i feel that the Sellers of such deadly plants should be held accountable for not labeling "toxic to Animals

and children"pray with me that my ginger survives..thank you

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on September 22, 2013:

Right now it sounds like your vet is doing the right thing. It is important she keeps taking in food to keep her system active and see if things are passing through okay day by day. A rubber band is a possibility (I have seen this happen before). I would hope that if there is no change in a day or two he would operate to investigate further and ensure nothing is blocking her intestine that is not showing up on the x-ray due to the nature of the object in question.

Susie on September 22, 2013:

Thank you so much for your reply. After I sent you the above post, the vet called me and asked how she was doing and when I told him that nothing had changed he said I should bring her right back; he wanted to x-ray her for foreign objects asap. I took her immediately and waited for the results, which were negative. He suggested leaving her overnight so they could treat her some more. It's now Sunday morning and he has called me; they gave her a mineral oil enema and she passed some stool but he can feel a bit more in upper part of her intestine. They are going to force feed her some soft food by mouth and see if she can evacuate. He still can't diagnose her, said it could be an intestinal virus, which the body has to fight on its own, or it could be something toxic she ingested, which also is a matter of time to be eliminated from her system. His main concern is to get food into her; that she needs food into her digestive system in order to be able to evacuate. So far she has not vomited again. Do you think this vet is on the right track? I am very concerned, needless to say. I have a hunch that she may have picked up a rubber band on the floor somewhere (which I have to keep shut up in a drawer because she will chew them but maybe one had somehow slipped onto the floor without my knowing) and it's not showing up on the x-ray. The vet did say that was possible, if it was scrunched up enough in her intestine that it couldn't be seen. If that's the case, I'm hoping that it will finally be passed when she defecates again, but who knows how long that could take? I'm feeling a bit helpless, to be honest.

Susie

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on September 21, 2013:

No you don't need to sign up to ask a question Susie as you have now found out.

I would recommend (from having worked in two vets surgeries) an x-ray to make sure she hasn't swallowed a foreign object that is blocking her intestine (I have seen this before in both dogs and cats, and it can be anything from a small toy, a needle, a cork, pen lid or whatever, only an x-ray can determine this).

I would suggest a second opinion personally as I am surprised your vet had not already done an x-ray after the first 24 hours with no change.

Please let me know what happens.

Good luck

Susie on September 21, 2013:

Would greatly appreciate any help/info you can provide. My nine year old girl cat has been completely listless for two days, with frequent vomiting of frothy and mucous yellow liquid only; no food interest but has had water, keeps visiting the litter box and straining to evacuate but unable to. Took her to vet today; he checked her blood levels: everything in normal range; gave her an enema and she had a partial evacuation but vet said he could still feel a stool in her intestines; gave her an appetite stimulant and a valium. As soon as I got her home she kept going to the litter box with no results for passing stool even with her straining to go. Still won't eat and she vomited again shortly after I got her home. I checked the few houseplants in the toxic list you provide (thank you) but found no signs of any having been chewed and I don't have any lilies of any kind. She does not have any diarrhea, which seems to be a symptom in plant poisoning. Called the vet back and he doesn't know what is wrong with her but said the next step would be x-rays of her intestines and possibly more enemas. Says she won't be able to have a bowel movement until she eats enough to push the stool through. Should I take her to a different vet? He is very experienced but isn't helping. He said maybe she got into something that upset her. She is strictly and indoor cat and could not have picked up or eaten anything from outdoors. Because she can't defecate, I am worried about possible bowel blockage and need to know how immediately this needs to be checked. Thank you again for any help you can give me to help her.

Susie on September 21, 2013:

Do I have to sign up to ask a question?

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on March 23, 2013:

Hi There, sounds like you might have an Aloe Vera that is one of the less toxic varieties (there are many variations). Generally they won't kill your cats, but can make them very unwell.

I must ask about your name 'Cassaday' as my Step Father (now in his late 70's) has this name, and his sisters have been trying to trace the family tree for some time now. The name (spelt this way) is quite rare, so if this is your surname I would be very grateful if you could contact me either here in the comments, or via a private message sent through my Hubpages profile page (see fan mail, then select 'email', no need to join the site) and give me a bit more info about where you live, family background etc so I can pass it on. You never know, you could be related to my Step Father and his family!!

cassaday@mchsi.com on March 23, 2013:

I have a 9 year old cat that has been chewing on my aloe plant for about 3 years and has never gotten sick from it. My other 2 cats won't touch it.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on March 04, 2013:

I am so sorry to hear this Cami1565, you must be heartbroken, but please don't let the guilt haunt you, it could have happened to anyone, and it could have been any plant, or some other cause of death completely. You now have at least got the chance to warn other cat owners of the risks, friends, family etc. You might find my article on coping with the loss of a pet helps a little bit: https://hubpages.com/animals/How-do-you-get-over-t...

Again I am really sincerely sorry for your loss.

Cami1565 on March 04, 2013:

Marley didn't make it and my heart is absolutely broken. I will always carry the guilt of buying the f@@@!!! Plant that took his life

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on March 04, 2013:

It sounds rather an nasty reaction if your cat only ate a 'tiny' piece of Hyacinth. I would be inclined to assume she either ate more than you realised (possibly including the bulb) or that she had an allergic reaction to it over and above the basic poisoning effects or that something else completely caused this. Certainly if this is as a result of an allergic reaction then it could definitely happen 'that fast', sometimes allergic reactions happen within minutes depending on what causes them and the level of reaction the animal in question has, (think of how quickly a person allergic to bee stings can react). I hope your cat survives this assuming she has not already died. Your vet will do his best to save her I am sure.

Good Luck.

cami1565 on March 03, 2013:

My cat ate the tiniest piece of a hyacinth leaf earlier today was was found unresponsive later on tonight. Can hyacinth kill that fast?

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on March 02, 2013:

Glad this was so helpful to you Rachel :)

Rachel on March 02, 2013:

What a fantastically helpful page. Especially helpful having pictures alongside names too. Excellent symptomatic breakdown and alternative names for plants. SO grateful for the reassurance this page has given tonight. Thank you so much.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on February 14, 2013:

I would not expect a Vet to know from memory every single plant that can cause your cat or dog a problem. Surprising as it may seem Vets do not know everything, and to be honest, in my experience of working in Vet's surgeries quite often I have seen the senior nurses know more than the vets do about things like this. Even vets frequently refer back to text books to check things out. I even had to explain to one vet I worked for that guinea-pigs can and do eat the flower as well as the stalk of dandelions (and he was generally a very good vet).

Don't take my word for the poinsettia and aloe vera statement, Google it and you will see it is confirmed on many sites. (Note I did say here in the article that Poinsettia is not too bad, although it can cause some problems). Aloe Vera is the one I would be most concerned about for the reasons listed.

jenny b on February 14, 2013:

I was told by my vet that poinsettas and aloe vera would not hurt my cat or my dog

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on January 08, 2013:

Thanks seanorjohn, I am delighted you enjoyed this and I hope your kitty stops being vomiting soon.

seanorjohn on January 08, 2013:

I had no idea so many plants were poisonous to cats. this explains why one of my cats was vomiting recently. I kept adjusting her diet but now I am convinced it must have been chewing plants. I noticed she was venturing further afield when I let her out by the front garden. Voted up.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on November 05, 2012:

Thank you RichieMogwai, that is an awesome compliment :)

Richie Mogwai from Vancouver on November 05, 2012:

Amazing, truly amazing hub. For one, I didn't realize that Aloe Vera and daffodils, in particular, are toxic to cats and dogs. This work of yours is truly an exhaustive effort worthy of Pinning and sharing with my friends. Thank you for doing this.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on October 05, 2012:

You are very welcome LakeCabin. I am glad you found this page before it was too late for your two kittens. You might also find my article on Lilies being capable of killing your cat within hours interesting.

https://hubpages.com/animals/Lilies-can-kill-your-...

LakeCabin on October 05, 2012:

Thanks so much for this information. I didn't know that lilies in particular were so toxic. I had an indoor/outdoor cat who lived for 21 years exposed to lilies, but I spent the last three years of his life hydrating him for failing kidneys. My last (and final) indoor/outdoor cat died suddenly without apparent cause, and I wonder if it was his favorite hunting ground under the orange daylilies. Most of my plants are succulents, and it is really grieving me to get rid of them, but now I have two inquisitive indoor kittens, so I guess I have to let them go. Their poisons, or acids are what help succulents survive in the wild, but I would rather it be my kittens. Thanks again for your hard work in putting together this page.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on August 19, 2012:

You are welcome Mythbuster. So pleased you found this in time (prior to your planting). I am really glad you found it helpful and also wish you well with your 'indoor gardening' which will definitely help to extend your growing season :)

mythbuster from Utopia, Oz, You Decide on August 19, 2012:

Thanks for the information, mistyhorizon2003. I just responded over on your article about community/urban gardening and mentioned I am planning indoor gardening to compensate for rising food costs and the short grow season where I live. I haven't taken enough precautions in my planning to know what plants to keep out of reach of my cat! This is a good list - and I'm glad you included your source (which lists more garden/vegetable plants). Luckily, I haven't planted anything I needed to deter my cat from snooping in (whew)... he's a snoopy, persistent li'l guy! :) Voted up - a very useful hub. Thanks again!

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on July 24, 2012:

Usually within a matter of a few hours, probably maximum of five or six hours. So long as she didn't wash it off herself she should be okay, but in the meantime please get rid of this plant as the pollen from lilies will readily drop on to surfaces where a cat could walk and get it on their paws etc. If your kitty looks at all unwell get her to a vet asap and tell him about the lily pollen on her nose.

Worried on July 24, 2012:

I brought a lily home yesterday not knowing it was poisonous and my kitty was smelling it and I think had some pollen residue on her nose. She did not eat any of it though. How long does it take for the side effects to happen if they do??

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on June 29, 2012:

Ahh, of course, I just checked this out and it is the 'Grape Hyacinth'. Thanks for the extra info :)

Kora Sewings on June 29, 2012:

Unfortunately I don't have the label which was together with the flowers when I bought them, so I might be wrong, but I think the Latin name for this flower was Muscari neglectum.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on June 29, 2012:

I am glad your cat is so much better now Kora, it is good to know this article has made a difference to her well-being. Also appreciate you adding the info about Muscari Mill. I am not familiar with the name, although the Muscari part does sound familiar to me from years ago when I grew Hyacinths.

Kora Sewings on June 29, 2012:

Thank you for your post! It was so helpful to me. My cat used to vomit and had diarrhea, but it never came to my head that it was because of the plants. We would blame food or her old age until last week when I suspected she tried Sweet Pea that I started growing at home, and she vomited some blood... But she is well now, and I got rid of all the suspicious plants.

One note though, it might be helpful: Muscari Mill is also poisonous. I cannot find any information about this plant, but I checked my notebook and noticed, that after a couple of days when I'd bought this flower, my cat was vomiting and had some sort of anorexia. Your post mentions Hyacinths - and Muscari Mill comes from this flower group; it surely is dangerous for cats, too. Sadly, it was my favourite flower, but I'm happy I wasn't too late to get rid of it, and this last week my cat was healthy and eating well again. Thank you once again!

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on May 14, 2012:

Hi Lori, I am so pleased your babies are safe and that you are a responsible owner who does get veterinary treatment for her pets. I am so glad I wrote this article when I did as the amount of positive comments on it show that it really does make a difference to saving lives.

Lori on May 14, 2012:

I have been nursing 2 of my babies back to health for 5 days now. Both ate on my devils ivy. I didn't not know this at first because the first one to show signs of illness was one that I have a chronic constipation problem with. I thought was was constipated at first the first day I just watched him, well as a result I almost lost him. He had not ate in 2 days and not drank for a day and a half before I realized something was terribly wrong. I gave pedialyte around the clock for 3 days. He litterally did not move for 3 days. In the meantime I started noticing the other one showing signs and now I am forcing pedialyte down her. My male is better,he is eating on his own but he still will not drink very much. I am still forcing pedialite but he is up and walking and even had 2 bowl movements. Now my female is constipated on top of everything else. She ate a little this morning but will not drink. I knew the devils ivy was poisonous but did not know the signs, thank you. Oh, and just to let you know I am working very closely with my vet on this.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on April 27, 2012:

Glad to be of help Daniella :)

Daniella on April 27, 2012:

Cannot thank you enough for taking the time and trouble to compile this excellent list with clear pictures. It is so helpful and some garden plants need to be evicted now.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on April 11, 2012:

Do be careful though Ravenpaw. my Mum had a Yorshire Terrier dog years ago that died after eating the neighbours Primroses from her garden. All the symptoms were there, convulsions/fitting etc.

I hope this comes in useful to you in the future too :)

Ravenpaw21 on April 11, 2012:

Great list, very helpful, esp since 2 flowers on here are ones my girl kitten has taken to chewing on (carnation & primrose) which i hope wont be fatal (she seems fine though thankfully) but i am definitley bookmarking this for future reference! :)

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on March 20, 2012:

Glad to be of help Catherine, and pleased you will be able to use this in the future as well :)

Catherine on March 20, 2012:

Thank you so much for the pictures & various names used for the same plant. My boys will be safe now & my boys are very curious. I have you in favorites & will be referring back to your site on a regular basis. Again, thank you very much.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on March 14, 2012:

Golly Kathleen, I wrote this article 2 years ago, and I have written loads more since. I did a whole load of research at the time, but cannot answer you as to where the one piece of info relating to the Orange plant came from without spending more time tracking it down again. I know I didn't imagine it and I have worked for two vets surgeries in my time. This article is simply a guideline, you would need to check it out with your vet or the ASPCA directly. Looking again at what I wrote I did not say it would kill your cat, the symptoms I list do not include death. Poisonous does not always mean it will be terminal as opposed to uncomfortable or requiring a vets attention to make your pet feel better.

Sorry I can't answer in more detail!

Kathleen on March 14, 2012:

Re my last comment: I did find info on the ASPCA website that said that the Essential Oils and some Chemical compounds of the Orange plant can be toxic to cats.

Essential Oils are usually very highly concentrated. It's hard to know what the ASPCA means by that general and somewhat vague description so I am not sure if a nibble on a flower or leaf would make the cat very sick, or kill it. I want to be certain, so I guess this is a good question for a vet. :)

Kathleen on March 14, 2012:

I'm really curious where you got your info on the Orange plant being toxic to cats. I think I have seen this on ONE website and other than that read somewhere that a "decorative" orange plant was dangerous.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on March 11, 2012:

I am honestly not sure on this one kenzie, but if by 'feather grass' you mean Pampas grass I have never heard of it being toxic to cats. In general grasses do not seem to be a problem as far as I am aware but best you check this out with your vet.

kenzie on March 11, 2012:

I recently put feather grass in my garden & my cats immediately were drawn to it.

Could this be harmful, as it's a decorative plant?

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on February 19, 2012:

No Valerie, this list is not a list of plants that cure problems, it is a list of plants that can cause problems. Only your vet can tell you a cure or what could have caused the problems your cat has had. Hope you do find a cure.

Valerie on February 19, 2012:

There's nothing her that helps once I bring my cat home from an overnight stay- with length of illness, long-term neurological affects- blindness, etc

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on February 11, 2012:

Glad to be of help Patricia, and glad your cat is okay now :)

Patricia on February 11, 2012:

My cat ate something that made her very ill and had to be taken to the vet. After reading this article I saw coleus in your article I have this plant so this must be the plant that my cat has eaten. Now I will get rid of this plant. Thanks a lot for this very useful information

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on February 05, 2012:

Whoops good point bellagirl61, I must have had a blonde moment (or a glass of wine) when I suggested indoor tomatoes, although my own cats ignore my outdoor ones, and would probably ignore any indoor ones. The way around the problem would be to have them in a container suspended from above, (like some people do with spider plants). So long as the foliage etc is out of reach of the cats there should not be a problem.

bellagirl61 on February 05, 2012:

I am confused by the last comment. tomato plants on included in the list but you mention indoor tomatoes. are some tomato plants toxic and other not?

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on January 22, 2012:

I wish I could answer that one in a comment blondie, but that would require a whole article in itself, plus hours and hours of research. The best bet is to find a list of plants you would like to have by name, and then check them out one at a time online to see if they are poisonous to cats or dogs. Alternatively go for plants you can eat such as vegetables grown indoors e.g. indoor tomatoes, chili peppers, salads etc. You could also buy fake plants too.

blondie on January 22, 2012:

Appreciate the info. Which houseplants CAN we have?

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on January 17, 2012:

I am so sorry for your loss Vanessa, at least you can now spread the word to other cat owners, and the more of us that do this the more cats we can save.

Vanessa on January 17, 2012:

A week ago, my cat died. He was drooling excessively and having seizures. I wish I found this page a long time ago. I have an arum lily plant, after viewing this page, i went to see the plant and sure enough, his little bite marks were all over the leaves and on the flower. Please, everyone, check your plants.

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on December 12, 2011:

Thanks Dan, I am hoping it saves many cat's lives and was therefore worth the time it took to compile all the information.

Dan Sheppard from Perth, Western Australia on December 12, 2011:

wow, this is incredibly detailed with the pictures. Thankyou very much!

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on November 27, 2011:

Hi Indi, I am sorry to hear about your little girl. It is important to remember that with lilies the pollen only has to get on the cats fur and the cat wash it off in order for it to cause kidney failure, and this happens very quickly. She doesn't need to have intentionally chewed on the plant itself. You might want to read my other article on this called 'Lilies can kill your cat within hours' (link below):

https://hubpages.com/animals/Lilies-can-kill-your-...

I agree plants should come with labels that say if they are dangerous to pets.

I hope your little girl does recover. Good luck.

Indi on November 27, 2011:

My three year old cat is in hospital as we speak with Kidney failure. The vet thinks it is the result of her eating from the 'Orange Lily' plant. I cannot see any evidence that she has eaten from any of my plants and I have never seen her eating any either but I have to consider this as being a possibility. Having had cats all my life and also being an avid gardener, I never realised the potential risks. Now after seeing this site, it seems I am going to have to rip up my whole garden and replace everything with cat 'friendly' plants. It should be mandatory that the labels that come with the plants advise whether they are poisonous to our beloved pets or not because if they did then my little girl wouldn't be in hospital fighting for her life right now!

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on November 14, 2011:

To be honest I would get rid of it as it will cause oral irritation and intense burning to both the mouth and lips, even if your kitten doesn't swallow it (see 'Devil's Ivy' in the A-Z list above).

junemoonbaby29 on November 14, 2011:

I have a devil's ivy plant, it is up high, but now my kitten found out how to get up there. She seems to want to nibble on it but now eating it. Is this ok or should I just get rid of the plant?? Thanks!!

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on October 18, 2011:

You are welcome gryphin423 :)

gryphin423 from Florida on October 18, 2011:

Great info, thanks!

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on October 02, 2011:

Thank you cleowolf, I am so sorry you lost your two cats as I know how devastating it is to lose a pet under any circumstances, but not to know why is even worse. I so hope this article helps you and others to prevent the death of their cats (present and future) through the simple mistake of having the wrong houseplants

cleowolf on October 02, 2011:

Very well written, concise and helpful article. Featuring the photos is a fantastic plus. I have lost two young cats in the last year due to mysterious circumstances, I am now wondering whether it was due to poison possibly from devil's ivy-what an apt name if so. I am in shock right now, my Tessa died suddenly with no signs of any trauma whatsoever. She did have a strange habit of gnawing on the wood of my dressers in the bedroom, wondered if it could be something toxic in the finish...thank you so much for such a helpful article though. Bless you!

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on August 30, 2011:

Hi jadednae, always go to a vet if in doubt, home remedies are always a last resort and should never be used in poisoning cases. I hope your kitten will be okay.

jadednae on August 30, 2011:

Thanks for making this HUB! Now I know why my kitten is sick! Please tell me what I can do for her to stop the diarrhea and make her well??? Home remedies or do I have to go to vet?

Cindy Lawson (author) from Guernsey (Channel Islands) on July 24, 2011:

I am so sorry to hear about your tabby cat Fatima, and I really hope this does help you to protect your other pets.