Skip to main content

6 Benefits of Declawing a Cat (and 10 Potential Drawbacks)

A big cat lover, who lives to write about all things regarding looking after his cat.

benefits-of-declawing-a-cat

Are you debating whether or not to declaw your cat? There are some pros and cons to consider when it comes to declawing your cat. Here are 6 benefits of declawing a cat that you may not have considered before.

1. Protects Your Furniture and Belongings

After your cat gets declawed, they will no longer be able to scratch up your furniture or belongings. This can save you a lot of money in the long run, as you won’t have to constantly replace or repair damaged items in your home.

2. Prevents Injuries to Yourself and Others

Cats can unintentionally injure people with their claws when they are playing around or getting too excited. If you have young children in the house, declawing your cat can help to prevent any accidental scratches or injuries.

3. Stops the Spread of Disease

When cats scratch themselves, they can spread bacteria and disease from their nails to their skin. This is especially dangerous for immunocompromised people, such as those undergoing cancer treatment. Declawing your cat can help to reduce the spread of disease.

4. Avoids Allergic Reactions

Some people are allergic to cat dander, which is a protein found in cat saliva. When cats groom themselves, they spread this protein around their fur, which can cause an allergic reaction in some people. If you or someone in your family is allergic to cat dander, declawing your cat can help to reduce the allergens in your home.

5. Makes Grooming Easier

Cats with claws can sometimes be difficult to groom, as they may not want their nails trimmed. Declawing your cat can make grooming easier and less stressful for both you and your pet.

6. Improves Your Relationship with Your Cat

Cats that scratch furniture or people can be difficult to live with. If you are constantly scolding your cat or getting frustrated with them, declawing them may help to improve your relationship. After they are declawed, you can focus on positive reinforcement and building a stronger bond with your cat.

If you are considering declawing your cat, be sure to talk to your veterinarian about the risks and benefits. Declawing should only be done as a last resort, after all other options have been exhausted.

What are the Drawbacks of Declawing Your Cat?

While there are some benefits to declawing your cat, there are also some drawbacks that you should be aware of.

1. Declawing Is a Surgical Procedure

Declawing is a surgical procedure that involves removing the nails and bone from your cat’s paws. This can be a painful and difficult recovery for your cat.

2. There Are Alternative Methods Available

Before you decide to declaw your cat, be sure to explore all of the other options that are available, such as nail trimming, nail caps, and scratching posts. These alternatives may be less expensive and less invasive than declawing.

3. There Are Risks Associated with Declawing

As with any surgical procedure, there are risks associated with declawing, such as infection, hemorrhage, and nerve damage. Be sure to discuss all of the risks with your veterinarian before you make a decision.

Scroll to Continue

Read More From Pethelpful

4. It May Not Solve the Problem

Declawing your cat does not guarantee that they will stop scratching furniture or people. In fact, some cats may become more aggressive after they are declawed. If you do decide to declaw your cat, be sure to provide them with plenty of alternative outlets for their scratching, such as cat trees and scratching posts.

5. It May Make Your Cat Less Adoptable

If you are considering declawing your cat in order to make them more adoptable, be aware that some shelters and rescue organizations will not adopt out cats that have been declawed. In fact, declawing may make it more difficult to find a home for your cat.

6. It Is Illegal in Some Countries

Declawing is illegal in some countries, such as the United Kingdom, Sweden, and Brazil. If you are considering declawing your cat, be sure to check the laws in your country before you proceed.

7. It May Not Be Right for Your Cat

Declawing should only be done as a last resort, after all other options have been exhausted. If you are considering declawing your cat, be sure to talk to your veterinarian about the risks and benefits first. For instance, if your cat likes to be predominantly outside, it can potentially make it more vulnerable.

8. Declawing Can Require Medication and Aesthesia

Your cat will likely need to be placed on pain medication and given anesthesia during the procedure. Be sure to discuss all of the risks and side effects of these medications with your veterinarian before you make a decision.

9. There Is a Risk of Complications

There is always a risk of complications when any type of surgery is performed. Be sure to discuss all of the risks with your veterinarian before you make a decision.

10. It May Not Be Covered by Your Insurance

Declawing is considered an elective surgery, which means that it may not be covered by your pet insurance policy. Be sure to check with your insurance company before you proceed.

Should You Actually Declaw Your Cat?

The decision to declaw your cat is a personal one that should not be taken lightly. There are both risks and benefits associated with the procedure, and it is important to weigh all of the factors before you make a decision. Be sure to talk to your veterinarian about the risks and benefits, as well as explore all of the other options that are available, such as nail trimming, nail caps, and scratching posts.

Talk to Your Vet About the Risks and Benefits of Declawing Your Cat

If you are considering declawing your cat, be sure to talk to your veterinarian about the risks and benefits first. This is a decision that should not be taken lightly, as there are both risks and benefits associated with the procedure. Your vet can help you to weigh all of the factors and make the best decision for your cat.

What are your thoughts on declawing? Have you ever considered it for your cat? Let us know in the comments!

This article is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge. It is not meant to substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, or formal and individualized advice from a veterinary medical professional. Animals exhibiting signs and symptoms of distress should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.

© 2022 Ritchie Hughie

Related Articles