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140+ Greek Dog Names (With Meanings)

James Livingood has been a dog sitter for several years. He has written numerous articles and a book about the topic because he loves dogs.

Dog watching others in Greece

Dog watching others in Greece

Greek culture is known for its varied contributions to society. From famous political structures to philosophers to mathematics, it may be harder to find something not heavily influenced by Greek culture. Perhaps that is why Greek dog names have started to gain popularity. This comprehensive list includes Greek names ranging from Achilles to Zeus. In addition, meanings and context are provided for each name. Finally, we look into several dog breeds that came from Greece. The hope is that by the end of this article, you have an extensive collection of names to choose for your new family member.

Greek Dog Names A-C

NameMeaning

Achilles

the greatest Greek warrior in the Trojan War and hero of Homer's Iliad. He killed Hector and was killed when Paris wounded him in the heel, his one vulnerable spot, with an arrow.

Adonis

From Phoenician adon meaning "lord". In Greek myth Adonis was a handsome young shepherd killed while hunting a wild boar. The anemone flower is said to have sprung from his blood. Because he was loved by Aphrodite, Zeus allowed him to be restored to life for part of each year. The Greeks borrowed this character from Semitic traditions, originally Sumerian (see Dumuzi).

Adrian

Form of Hadrianus (see Hadrian) used in several languages.

Agatha

a female given name: from a Greek word meaning good.

Agnes

Latinized form of the Greek name (Hagne), derived from Greek (hagnos) meaning "chaste".

Ajax

a Greek hero in the Trojan War who rescued the body of Achilles and killed himself out of jealousy when Odysseus was awarded the armor of Achilles.

Alexa

a female given name, form of Alexandra.

Alexandra

queen consort of Edward VII of England.

Alexis

Feminine form of Alexander. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.

Alpha

First letter of the Greek alphabet

Amara

Means "grace" in Igbo.

Ambrosia

Mythical food of the Greek gods

Anastasia

Feminine form of Anastasius. This was the name of a 4th-century Dalmatian saint who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Due to her, the name has been common in Eastern Orthodox Christianity (in various spellings). As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the youngest daughter of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, who was rumoured to have escaped the execution of her family in 1918.

Angela

a female given name: from a Greek word meaning messenger.

Antigone

a daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta who defied her uncle, King Creon, by performing funeral rites over her brother, Polynices, and was condemned to be immured alive in a cave.

Aphrodite

the ancient Greek goddess of love and beauty, identified by the Romans with Venus.

Apollo

the ancient Greek and Roman god of light, healing, music, poetry, prophecy, and manly beauty; the son of Leto and brother of Artemis.

Archimedes

Greek mathematician, physicist, and inventor: discovered the principles of specific gravity and of the lever.

Argos

an ancient city in SE Greece, on the Gulf of Argolis: a powerful rival of Sparta, Athens, and Corinth.

Aristotle

Greek philosopher: pupil of Plato; tutor of Alexander the Great.

Artemis

an ancient Greek goddess, the daughter of Leto and the sister of Apollo, characterized as a virgin huntress and associated with the moon.

Asclepius

a son of Apollo and the ancient Greek god of medicine and healing, worshiped by the Romans as Aesculapius.

Athena

the virgin deity of the ancient Greeks worshiped as the goddess of wisdom, fertility, the useful arts, and prudent warfare. At her birth she sprang forth fully armed from the head of her father, Zeus.

Athens

a city in and the capital of Greece, in the southeastern part.

Atlas

a bound collection of maps.

Aura

a distinctive and pervasive quality or character; air; atmosphere: an aura of respectability; an aura of friendliness.

Basil

any of several aromatic herbs belonging to the genus Ocimum, of the mint family: prized for its savory green leaves, sweet basil (O. basilicum) has more than 150 culinary cultivars, including the tiny-leafed bush basil , the large-leafed mammoth basil , and the purple-leafed dark opal basil .

Bernice

a female given name: from a Greek word meaning bringer of victory.

Boreas

the ancient Greek personification of the north wind.

Cadmus

Greek mythology character, founder of Thebes

Caesar

From a Roman cognomen that possibly meant "hairy", from Latin caesaries "hair". Julius Caesar and his adopted son Julius Caesar Octavianus (commonly known as Augustus) were both rulers of the Roman Empire in the 1st century BC. Caesar was used as a title by the emperors that came after them.

Calista

Feminine form of Callistus. As an English name it might also be a variant of Kallisto.

Carissa

Genus of plants

Cassia

a variety of cinnamon derived from the cassia-bark tree.

Chaos

a state of utter confusion or disorder; a total lack of organization or order.

Chloe

the lover of Daphnis in a Greek pastoral romance.

Chobani

American food company that makes Greek Yogurt

Chronos

Ancient Greek personification of time

Cicero

Roman statesman, lawyer, orator and philosopher

Cleopatra

Last active pharaoh of Ptolemaic Egypt

Clio

Muse of history in Ancient Greek mythology

Cole

any of various plants of the genus Brassica, of the mustard family, especially kale and rapeseed.

Constantine

pope 708-715.

Corban

a sacrifice or offering made to God, especially among the ancient Hebrews in fulfillment of a vow.

Cressida

(in medieval adaptations of the story of the Trojan wars) a Trojan woman portrayed as the lover of Troilus, whom she deserts for Diomedes.

Cy

Short form of Cyrus or Cyril.

Greek dog in front of store

Greek dog in front of store

Greek Dog Names D-G

NameMeaning

Damon

Derived from Greek (damazo) meaning "to tame". According to Greek legend, Damon and Pythias were friends who lived on Syracuse in the 4th century BC. When Pythias was sentenced to death, he was allowed to temporarily go free on the condition that Damon take his place in prison. Pythias returned just before Damon was to be executed in his place, and the king was so impressed with their loyalty to one another that he pardoned Pythias. As an English given name, it has only been regularly used since the 20th century.

Daphne

a nymph who, when pursued by Apollo, was saved by being changed into a laurel tree.

Darius

king of Persia 521-486.

Deacon

(in hierarchical churches) a member of the clerical order next below that of a priest.

Delia

a female given name, form of Cordelia.

Delphi

an ancient city in central Greece, in Phocis: site of an oracle of Apollo.

Delta

the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet

Demeter

the ancient Greek chthonian goddess of agriculture and the protector of marriage and the social order, identified by the Romans with Ceres. She presided over the Eleusinian mysteries.

Demetrius

king of Macedonia 294-286 (son of Antigonus I).

Demi

Alternate transcription of Greek (see Dimi).

Dennis

English dramatist and critic.

Dido

Legendary founder and first queen of Carthage

Dina

the daughter of Jacob and Leah. Genesis 30:21.

Dionne

Feminine form of Dion.

Dogma

an official system of principles or tenets concerning faith, morals, behavior, etc., as of a church.

Dolmadakia

Traditional Greek eatery

Dora

a female given name: from a Greek word meaning gift.

Dorian

of or relating to the ancient Greek region of Doris or to the Dorians.

Echo

a repetition of sound produced by the reflection of sound waves from a wall, mountain, or other obstructing surface.

Electra

the daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra who incited her brother Orestes to kill Clytemnestra and her lover Aegisthus.

Elena

a female given name, form of Helen.

Eleni

Modern Greek form of Helen.

Evan

a male given name, Welsh form of John.

Evangeline

a female given name, invented by H.W. Longfellow.

Feta

a soft, white, brine-cured Greek cheese made from sheep's milk or goat's milk.

Frappe

a milkshake made with ice cream.

Galen

Greek physician and writer on medicine.

Genesis

an origin, creation, or beginning.

Giles

From the Late Latin name Aegidius, which is derived from Greek (aigidion) meaning "young goat". Saint Giles was an 8th-century miracle worker who came to southern France from Greece. He is regarded as the patron saint of the crippled. In Old French the name Aegidius became Gidie and then Gilles, at which point it was imported to England.

Gregory

Irish dramatist.

Griffin

a fabled monster, usually having the head and wings of an eagle and the body of a lion.

Gyro

gyrocompass.

Dog Walking on Greek Beach

Dog Walking on Greek Beach

Greek Dog Names H-O

NameMeaning

Hades

God of the underworld in Greek mythology

Harmony

agreement; accord; harmonious relations.

Hecate

a goddess of the earth and Hades, associated with sorcery, hounds, and crossroads.

Helios

the ancient Greek god of the sun, represented as driving a chariot across the heavens; identified by the Romans with Sol.

Hermes

the ancient Greek herald and messenger of the gods and the god of roads, commerce, invention, cunning, and theft.

Hermione

the daughter of Menelaus and Helen.

Hero

a person noted for courageous acts or nobility of character: He became a local hero when he saved the drowning child.

Homer

Name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the author of the ''Iliad'' and the ''Odyssey''

Icarus

a youth who attempted to escape from Crete with wings of wax and feathers but flew so high that his wings melted from the heat of the sun, and he plunged to his death in the sea.

Indigo

a blue dye obtained from various plants, especially of the genus Indigofera, or manufactured synthetically.

Jace

Short form of Jason.

Julian

of, relating to, or characteristic of Julius Caesar.

Kal

kalends.

Kalamata

a purplish-black, almond-shaped olive with a fruity flavor and meaty texture, often split and cured in brine and packed in vinegar.

Kosmos

the world or universe regarded as an orderly, harmonious system.

Kudos

honor; glory; acclaim: He received kudos from everyone on his performance.

Larissa

a city in E Thessaly, in E Greece.

Leander

a Greek youth, the lover of Hero, who swam the Hellespont every night to visit her until he was drowned in a storm.

Leo

the Lion, a zodiacal constellation between Virgo and Cancer, containing the bright star Regulus.

Libra

the ancient Roman pound (containing 5053 grains or 327.4 grams).

Lyra

the Lyre, a northern constellation between Cygnus and Hercules, containing the bright star Vega.

Lyric

(of poetry) having the form and musical quality of a song, and especially the character of a songlike outpouring of the poet's own thoughts and feelings, as distinguished from epic and dramatic poetry.

Maximus

Roman family name that was derived from Latin maximus "greatest". Saint Maximus was a monk and theologian from Constantinople in the 7th century.

Medea

a sorceress, wife of Jason, whom she assisted in obtaining the Golden Fleece: when Jason deserted her, she killed their children.

Meg

megohm; megohms.

Miles

Unit of length

Muse

Inspirational goddesses of literature, science, and the arts

Neo

near-earth object.

Neri

Italian priest: founder of Congregation of the Oratory.

Nike

the ancient Greek goddess of victory.

Nyx

an ancient Greek goddess personifying night.

Odysseus

king of Ithaca; son of Laertes; one of the heroes of the Iliad and protagonist of the Odyssey: shrewdest of the Greek leaders in the Trojan War.

Olive

an evergreen tree, Olea europaea, of Mediterranean and other warm regions, cultivated chiefly for its fruit.

Olympia

a plain in ancient Elis, Greece, where the ancient Olympic Games were held.

Omega

Last letter of the Greek alphabet

Opa

Celebration phrase

Oracle

(especially in ancient Greece) an utterance, often ambiguous or obscure, given by a priest or priestess at a shrine as the response of a god to an inquiry.

Othello

Perhaps an Italian diminutive of Otho. Shakespeare used this name in his tragedy Othello (1603), where it belongs to a Moor who is manipulated by Iago into killing his wife Desdemona.

Otis

From an English surname that was derived from the medieval given name Ode, a cognate of Otto. In America it has been used in honour of the revolutionary James Otis (1725-1783).

Owen

English zoologist and anatomist.

Dog in Crete

Dog in Crete

Greek Dog Names P-Z

NameMeaning

Pandora

Mythological figure

Penelope

the wife of Odysseus, who remained faithful to him during his long absence at Troy.

Perry

a fermented beverage similar to cider, made from the juice of pears.

Philo

a combining form appearing in loanwords from Greek, where it meant loving (philology); on this model, used in the formation of compound words (philoprogenitive).

Phoenix

a mythical bird of great beauty fabled to live 500 or 600 years in the Arabian wilderness, to burn itself on a funeral pyre, and to rise from its ashes in the freshness of youth and live through another cycle of years: often an emblem of immortality or of reborn idealism or hope.

Pita

Yeast leavened flatbread baked from wheat flour

Plato

Classical Athenian philosopher, founder of Platonism

Rue

to feel sorrow over; repent of; regret bitterly: to rue the loss of opportunities.

Santorini

a Greek island in the southern Aegean Sea, in the Cyclades group, 30 sq. mi. (78 sq. km)

Sirius

the Dog Star, the brightest-appearing star in the heavens, located in the constellation Canis Major.

Socrates

Athenian philosopher.

Spanakopita

a baked dish consisting of spinach, feta cheese, eggs, and scallions enclosed in layers of phyllo.

Sparta

an ancient city in S Greece: the capital of Laconia and the chief city of the Peloponnesus, at one time the dominant city of Greece: famous for strict discipline and training of soldiers.

Spiro

Anglicized form of Spyros.

Tansy

any of several composite plants of the genus Tanacetum, especially a strong-scented, weedy, Old World herb, T. vulgare, having flat-topped clusters of tubular yellow flowers.

Tessa

Diminutive of Theresa.

Thea

Short form of Dorothea, Theodora, Theresa and other names with a similar sound.

Theo

a combining form meaning god, used in the formation of compound words: theocrat.

Topaz

a mineral, a fluosilicate of aluminum, usually occurring in prismatic orthorhombic crystals of various colors, and used as a gem.

Triton

a positively-charged particle consisting of a proton and two neutrons, equivalent to the nucleus of an atom of tritium.

Tzatziki

a condiment or dip consisting of yogurt, cucumber, garlic, and usually mint.

Ulysses

Latin name for Odysseus.

Venus

an ancient Italian goddess of gardens and spring, identified by the Romans with Aphrodite as the goddess of love and beauty.

Zephyr

From the Greek (Zephyros) meaning "west wind". Zephyros was the Greek god of the west wind.

Zeus

the supreme deity of the ancient Greeks, a son of Cronus and Rhea, brother of Demeter, Hades, Hera, Hestia, and Poseidon, and father of a number of gods, demigods, and mortals; the god of the heavens, identified by the Romans with Jupiter.

Kokoni dog looking upward

Kokoni dog looking upward

4 Dog Breeds that Started in Greece

Greece is known for a lot of things. One of the more surprising things is that this is the birthplace to a number of dog breeds. I've gone ahead and listed out four of the more interesting ones below. However, any of these would make a great addition to your home.

Breed 1: Alopekis

This dog is often described as being "fox-like" in appearance. This dog breed neared extinction as programs were enacted to control stray dog populations. However, you can find small pockets of them in northern Greece. They are often very social, easy going, and easy to train dogs. They are also known for being good with children.

Breed 2: Cretan Hound

This is a very slender type of dog. Many consider this breed of dog ancient as it may date back to Neolithic times. They have wonderful reflexes, have great stamina, and can quickly move over rocky terrain. These dogs were used to hunt prey and sometimes suck on stones to try and get the scent.

Breed 3: Greek Shepherd

This is a livestock guarding dog. This is another dog breed that is thought to be ancient, as it was Plato wrote about similar dogs. They have a powerful build and a thick double-coat. They are known to be over-zealous on protecting flocks. Often times they will not only guard their master's flock, but will sometimes expand their duty to guard the entire countryside. They are considered a bit more on the aggressive side.

Breed 4: Kokoni

This is a smaller dog breed. They don't bark much, but are known for loud barks when they do decide to use their voice. They generally have a sunny, happy mood and are not known aggression or being timid. Many also believe they are a joy to train and are fairly intelligent.

In summation, these are just four dog breeds that got their start in Greece. There are many more to discover. In addition, Greek people have been known to cherish their relationship with dogs. Not only were dogs wonderful company, but they served a variety of purposes. Even famous Greeks, like Aristotle, wrote extensively about dogs. Hopefully you'll choose one of these wonderful breeds to add to your household.

© 2021 James Livingood

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