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150+ French Dog Names (With Meanings)

James Livingood has been a dog sitter for several years. He has written numerous articles and a book about the topic because he loves dogs.

French Dog Names

French Dog Names

Naming your dog can be a fun way to reflect your heritage. Even if you aren't French, France is a country that boasts rich history, arts, architecture, scenery and culinary triumphs. From sweet pastries, to famous landmarks, you are sure to find a lot of inspiration when naming your new family member. Here are over 150 French dog names with meanings.

French Dog Names A-C

NameMeaning

Adeline

French and English form of Adelina

Adrien

French form of Adrian

Alphonse

French form of Alfonso

Alvin

From a medieval form of any of the Old English names Ælfwine, Æðelwine or Ealdwine. It was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the Old English names. As a Scandinavian name it is derived from Alfvin, an Old Norse cognate of Ælfwine

Antoine

Antoine 1728-1804 French chemist

Arthur

A legendary king of the Britons whose story is based on traditions of a sixth century military leader

Béatrice

A Florentine woman idealized in Dante's Vita Nuova and Divina Commedia

Beau

Means "beautiful" in French. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century. In Margaret Mitchell's novel Gone with the Wind (1936) this is the name of Ashley and Melanie's son.Although this is a grammatically masculine adjective in French, it is given to girls as well as boys in Britain and the Netherlands. In America it is more exclusively masculine. It is not commonly used as a name in France itself

Beaumont

From a French surname meaning "beautiful mountain

Bella

Short form of Isabella and other names ending in bella. It is also associated with the Italian word bella meaning "beautiful". It was used by the American author Stephenie Meyer for the main character in her popular Twilight series of novels, first released 2005, later adapted into a series of movies beginning 2008

Bernadette

French feminine form of Bernard. Bernadette Soubirous (1844-1879) was a young woman from Lourdes in France who claimed to have seen visions of the Virgin Mary. She was declared a saint in 1933

Bernadine

Feminine form of Bernard

Bijoux

A small dainty usually ornamental piece of delicate workmanship : jewel

Bonaparte

Corsican family including Napoléon I(q.v.) and his brothers: Joseph 1768-1844 king of Naples and Spain; Lucien 1775-1840 prince of Canino; Louis 1778-1846 father of Napoléon III king of Holland; Jérôme 1784-1860 king of Westphalia

Bonbon

Small chocolate confection

Bordeaux

Prefecture and commune in Nouvelle-Aquitaine, France

Bridgette

Variant of Bridget

Brie

A soft surface-ripened cheese with a whitish rind and a pale yellow interior

Brioche

Light slightly sweet bread made with a rich yeast dough

Bruno

Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged to Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition. A modern bearer is the American singer Bruno Mars (1985-), born Peter Gene Hernandez

Camille

French feminine and masculine form of Camilla. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine

Cecile

Pierre-Cécile 1824-1898 French painter and muralist

Celine

Variant of Céline

Chanel

French fashion house

Chapelle

City in western Germany near the borders with Belgium and the Netherlands population 241,861

Charlotte

A dessert consisting of a filling (as of fruit, whipped cream, or custard) layered with or placed in a mold lined with strips of bread, ladyfingers, or biscuits

Cherie

Derived from French chérie meaning "darling". In America, Cherie came into use shortly after the variant Sherry, and has not been as common

Chloé

A lover of Daphnis in a Greek pastoral romance

Clara

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus, which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares.As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara overtook it in the 19th century and became very popular. It declined through most of the 20th century (being eclipsed by the French form Claire in English-speaking countries), though it has since recovered somewhat

Claude

French masculine and feminine form of Claudius. In France the masculine name has been common since the Middle Ages due to the 7th-century Saint Claude of Besançon. It was imported to Britain in the 16th century by the aristocratic Hamilton family, who had French connections. A famous bearer of this name was the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926)

Claudette

French feminine form of Claudius

Colette

Short form of Nicolette. Saint Colette was a 15th-century French nun who gave her money to the poor. This was also the pen name of the French author Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954)

Coraline

2002 children novella by Neil Gaiman

Corbin

From a French surname that was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-) [1]

Crème brûlée

A rich custard topped with caramelized sugar

Crepe

A light crinkled fabric woven of any of various fibers

Croissant

A flaky rich crescent-shaped roll

Curtis

Charles 1860-1936 vice president of the U.S. (1929-33)

Dog inside shop

Dog inside shop

French Dog Names D-H

NameMeaning

Delphine

French form of Delphina

Dior

Christian 1905-1957 French fashion designer

Dominique

Any of a U.S. breed of domestic chickens with a rose comb, yellow legs, and barred plumage

Durant

Will(iam James) 1885-1981 and his wife Ariel 1898-1981 originally Ada Kaufman American writers

Éclair

A small chocolate-covered creme-filled pastry puff in a general oblong shape, typically larger than the miniature French version

Eiffel

Alexandre-Gustave 1832-1923 French engineer

Escargot

A snail prepared for use as food

Étoile

Under the beautiful star : in the open air at night : under the stars

Fabien

French form of Fabianus (see Fabian)

Fabrice

French form of the Roman family name Fabricius, which was derived from Latin faber meaning "craftsman". Gaius Fabricius Luscinus was a 3rd-century BC Roman general and statesman

Financier

One who specializes in raising and expending public moneys

Fleur

Means "flower" in French. Saint Fleur of Issendolus (Flor in Gascon) was a 14th-century nun from Maurs, France. This was also the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels The Forsyte Saga (1922)

Florian

From the Roman cognomen Florianus, a derivative of Florus. This was the name of a short-lived Roman emperor of the 3rd century, Marcus Annius Florianus. It was also borne by Saint Florian, a martyr of the 3rd century, the patron saint of Poland and Upper Austria

Fondue

A dish similar to a soufflé usually made with cheese and bread crumbs

Fontaine

Jean de 1621-1695 French poet

Frederic

Frédéric-Auguste 1834-1904 French sculptor

Gabriel

One of the four archangels named in Hebrew tradition

Gabrielle

French feminine form of Gabriel. This was the real name of French fashion designer Coco Chanel (1883-1971)

Galette

A type of flat, round cake from France

Ganache

A rich sauce, made of chocolate and cream, used also as the filling of truffles, and as a glaze

Garnier

Medieval French form of Werner

Gaston

Possibly from a Germanic name derived from the element gast meaning "stranger, guest". This is the usual French name for Saint Vedastus, called Vaast in Flemish, and alternatively the name may be connected to it. The name was also borne by several counts of Foix-Béarn, beginning in the 13th century

Gaultier

French variant form of Walter

Geneva

A highly aromatic bitter gin originally made in the Netherlands

Giselle

Romantic ballet in two acts

Givenchy

French luxury fashion and perfume house

Gustave

French form of Gustav. This name was borne by the French artist Gustave Doré (1832-1883)

Henri

French form of Heinrich (see Henry)

Hermès

A Greek god of commerce, eloquence, invention, travel, and theft who serves as herald and messenger of the other gods

Hubert

Means "bright heart", derived from the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind" and beraht "bright". Saint Hubert was an 8th-century bishop of Maastricht who is considered the patron saint of hunters. The Normans brought the name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Hygebeorht. It died out during the Middle Ages but was revived in the 19th century [2]

Hugo

Latinized form of Hugh. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of The Hunchback of Notre-Dame and Les Misérables

Dog statue

Dog statue

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French Dog Names I-M

NameMeaning

Isabelle

French form of Isabel

Jacques

(Jacques) Arsène 1851-1940 French biophysicist

Javier

Spanish form of Xavier

Jean

A durable twilled cotton cloth used especially for sportswear and work clothes

Joakim

Scandinavian, Macedonian and Serbian form of Joachim

Jolie

Means "pretty" in French. This name was popularized by American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-), whose surname was originally her middle name. It is not used as a given name in France

Josephine

English, German and Dutch form of Joséphine

Julien

French form of Iulianus (see Julian)

Juliette

French diminutive of Julie

Lafayette

Marquis de 1757-1834 Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier French general and statesman

Laurent

Louis Stephen 1882-1973 Canadian politician; prime minister (1948-57)

Lilou

Either a diminutive of French names containing the sound lee or a combination of Lili and Louise

Lisette

Diminutive of Élisabeth

Louis

Any gold or silver coin issued by the French kings from Louis XIII to Louis XVI and bearing their image on the obverse side, particularly the gold louis d'ors, originally a French form of the Spanish doubloon but varying in value between 10 and 24 livres

Louise

French feminine form of Louis

Louvre

Art museum and historic site in Paris, France

Luc

French and Welsh form of Lucas (see Luke)

Lucille

French form of Lucilla. A famous bearer was American comedienne Lucille Ball (1911-1989)

Lyon

Third-largest city of France

Macaron

Sweet meringue-based confectionery

Madeleine

A small rich shell-shaped cake

Manet

Édouard 1832-1883 French painter

Marc

The residue remaining after a fruit has been pressed; broadly : the organic residue from an extraction process

Marcel

A deep soft wave made in the hair by the use of a heated curling iron

Margeaux

Canadian singer, songwriter, fashion designer and television personality

Marguerite

French form of Margaret. This is also the French word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare)

Marie

French and Czech form of Maria. It has been very common in France since the 13th century. At the opening of the 20th century it was given to approximately 20 percent of French girls. This percentage has declined steadily over the course of the century, and it dropped from the top rank in 1958.A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.In France it is occasionally used as a masculine name in pairings such as Jean-Marie

Marseille

Commune and port on the Gulf of Lion in southeastern France population 850,726

Martin

A small Eurasian bird (Delichon urbica) of the swallow family with a forked tail, bluish-black head and back, and white rump and underparts

Matisse

Henri (-Émile-Benoît) 1869-1954 French painter

Matthieu

Variant of Mathieu

Maurice

1521-1553 elector of Saxony (1547-53) and general

Maxime

Sir Paul Maxime 1949- British geneticist

Mont Blanc

Highest mountain in the Alps (4,808 m)

Moscato

A white grape variety used to make light, sweet white wine

Mousse

An airy pudding served chilled, particularly chocolate mousse

Dog outside restaurant

Dog outside restaurant

French Dog Names N-S

NameMeaning

Nice

Polite, kind

Noel

English form of Noël or Noëlle (rarely). It was fairly popular in the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand in the middle of the 20th century. It is occasionally written with a diaeresis, like in French. A famous bearer is British musician Noel Gallagher (1967-)

Noelle

English form of Noëlle

Odette

French diminutive of Oda or Odilia. This is the name of a princess who has been transformed into a swan in the ballet Swan Lake (1877) by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Odie

Dog character from the Garfield comic strip

Oliver

From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as Alfher or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see Olaf). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic La Chanson de Roland, in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due in part to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London. It became very popular at the beginning of the 21st century, reaching the top rank for boys in England and Wales in 2009 and entering the top ten in the United States in 2017

Olivier

French and Dutch form of Oliver. This is also the French word meaning "olive tree

Orville

This name was invented by the 18th-century writer Fanny Burney, who perhaps intended it to mean "golden city" in French. Orville Wright (1871-1948), together with his brother Wilbur, invented the first successful airplane

Palmier

A type of puff pastry biscuit made in the shape of a palm leaf and rolled in sugar

Papillon

A breed of small dog with large ears; a dog of that breed

Paris

Capital and largest city of France

Pascal

A unit of pressure in the meter-kilogram-second system equivalent to one newton per square meter

Pascale

Feminine form of Pascal

Patrice

Patrice (Hemery) 1925-1961 Zaire politician

Paul

An early Christian apostle and missionary and author of several New Testament epistles

Percival

Created by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his poem Perceval, the Story of the Grail. Chrétien may have derived the name from Old French perce val "pierce the valley", or he may have based it loosely on the Welsh name Peredur [1]. In the poem Perceval is a boy from Wales who hopes to become a knight under King Arthur. Setting out to prove himself, he eventually comes to the castle of the Fisher King and is given a glimpse of the Grail

Percy

From an English surname that was derived from the name of a Norman town Perci, which was itself perhaps derived from a Gaulish given name that was Latinized as Persius. The surname was borne by a noble English family, and it first used as a given name in their honour. A famous bearer was Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), an English romantic poet whose works include Adonais and Ozymandias. This name can also be used as a short form of Percival

Pierre

French form of Peter. This name has been consistently popular in France since the 13th century, but fell out of the top 100 names in 2017. It was borne by Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), a French impressionist painter, and Pierre Curie (1859-1906), a physicist who discovered radioactivity with his wife Marie

Pompidou

Georges (-Jean-Raymond) 1911-1974 French politician; prime minister (1962-68) and president (1969-74) of France

Porter

A person stationed at a door or gate to admit or assist those entering

Praline

A confection of nuts and sugar: such as

Quentin

Commune in northern France on the Somme River northwest of Laon population 55,978

Quincy

From an English surname that was derived (via the place name Cuinchy) from the personal name Quintus. A famous bearer was John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), sixth president of the United States, who was born in the town of Quincy, Massachusetts. Both the town and the president were named after his maternal great-grandfather John Quincy (1689-1767). Another notable bearer is the American musician Quincy Jones (1933-)

Raphael

16th-century Italian painter and architect

Renée

Renée 1959- American soprano

Richard

Means "brave ruler", derived from the Germanic elements ric "ruler, mighty" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.During the late Middle Ages this name was typically among the five most common for males (with John, William, Robert and Thomas). It remained fairly popular through to the modern era, peaking in the United States in the 1940s and in the United Kingom a bit later, and steadily declining since that time.Famous bearers include two German opera composers, Richard Wagner (1813-1883) and Richard Strauss (1864-1949), as well as British explorer Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890), American president Richard Nixon (1913-1994), American physicist Richard Feynman (1918-1988), British actor Richard Burton (1925-1984) and American musician Little Richard (1932-2020)

Rochelle

From the name of the French city La Rochelle, meaning "little rock". It first became commonly used as a given name in America in the 1930s, probably due to the fame of actress Rochelle Hudson (1914-1972) and because of the similarity to the name Rachel

Roxanne

Variant of Roxane

Sabine

French, German, Dutch and Danish form of Sabina

Samuel

The early Hebrew judge who successively anointed Saul and David king

Savarin

A type of leavened cake often drizzled with liquor

Sébastien

Sébastien Le Prestre de 1633-1707 French military engineer; marshal of France

Simone

Simone 1908-1986 French author

Sinclair

Upton Beall 1878-1968 American writer and politician

Soirée

A party or reception held in the evening

Soufflé

A dish that is made from a sauce, egg yolks, beaten egg whites, and a flavoring or purée (as of seafood, fruit, or vegetables) and baked until puffed up

Stéphane

Stéphane 1842-1898 French poet

Suzette

A thin folded or rolled pancake in a hot orange-butter sauce that is sprinkled with a liqueur (such as cognac or curaçao) and set ablaze for serving

Sylvie

French and Czech form of Silvia

Dog looking out from railing

Dog looking out from railing

French Dog Names T-Z

NameMeaning

Tarte

A caramelized apple tart that is baked with pastry on top and then inverted for serving

Théodore

Badlands in three areas along the Little Missouri River in western North Dakota

Thierry

Town in northern France on the Marne River southwest of Reims population 14,923

Toulouse

Prefecture and commune in Occitanie, France

Troy

Homeric ancient city in northwest Asia Minor

Valentin

Marcel (Valentin Louis Georges Eugène) 1871-1922 French novelist

Versailles

Commune in northern France population 86,110

Victor

One that defeats an enemy or opponent : winner

Violetta

Italian, Russian and Hungarian form of Violet

Violette

French form of Violet

Voltaire

French writer, historian, and philosopher

Yannick

Diminutive of Yann or Yanna

Yves

Yves 1930-2015 French chemist

Zara

City and port on the Adriatic Sea in Croatia population 71,500

© 2022 James Livingood

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