Can I Give My Dog Shots at Home or Should I Take Him to the Vet?

Is It Possible to Self-Administer Dog Vaccine?

You may be wondering: “Can I give my dog shots at home?” While the short answer is yes, most people can give their dogs a shot, other questions to ask are: “Should I give my dog shots?” or "What shots does my dog really need, and what shots should we avoid?"

How Much Do Dog Vaccinations Cost?

One major reason for giving dog shots at home is to save money. However, what is the cost savings? Let’s compare a recent vet bill for two common canine vaccinations.

This cost comparison is based on purchasing the vaccines online from Doctors Foster and Smith and includes shipping and handling charges. (Vaccines must be shipped by one or two-day air; costs were calculated using the one-day air rate of $14.99.)

The prices for the veterinary services were verified at Vinton Veterinary Hospital in Vinton, Virginia on December 15, 2011 and are the usual and customary charges for having our dogs vaccinated at their facility.

The vaccines in this example ship to Virginia and so a prescription is not required for needles and syringes. Be aware that other states could require a prescription.

  • Cost of canine DHLPP vaccine booster shot
  • Vet = $51.50 (includes office visit)
  • Self-administered = $18.98 (includes needle and syringe)
  • Savings = $32.52
  • Cost of Bordetella Booster
  • Vet = $20.00 (does not include office visit)
  • Self-administered = $18.18 (includes purchasing a needle and syringe)
  • Savings = $1.82
  • Office visit to consult with vet: $49.00

For a net savings of around $34, you have to decide for yourself if it is cost effective to administer the shots, especially if you are squeamish, or own a large animal that might be difficult to inject.

In addition, since the canine DHLPP vaccine (at least at our veterinarian's office) includes an office visit, we know our dog also gets a complete checkup and the vet will let us know if he sees any warning signs of potential trouble. For us, that peace of mind is worth the extra cost.

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Can I Give My Dog Shots At Home?

Do you take your dog to the vet for shots or do the injections yourself?

  • I always take my dog to the vet for shots.
  • I administer routine vaccinations to my dog, but use the vet for other injections.
  • There is no way I'm going to give my dog a shot at home!
  • I take my dog to the vet for shots but I'm considering doing it myself to save money.
See results without voting

List of Basic Dog Shots

Veterinary medicine, like other branches of medicine, evolves based on new research about animal health, and one recent change concerns canine immunizations.

Here we'll discuss current vaccination guidelines and give you a list of dog shots. You need this information to select the proper medicines if you decide to give your dog shots at home instead of taking it to the vet.

Consult your vet for advice about which vaccinations to give your dogs, as needs vary in individual dogs depending on age, weight, health, and so forth.

According to the UC Davis VMTH Canine and Feline Vaccination Guidelines, appropriate vaccines for canines are separated into core, noncore, and not recommended groups.

The core vaccinations for “all puppies and dogs with an unknown vaccination history” 1 are rabies, canine adenovirus (CAV), canine distemper (CDV), and canine parvovirus (CPV).

Noncore vaccinations are canine influenza virus (CIV), canine parainfluenza, canine distemper-measles combination vaccine, canine leptospira spp. vaccine, bordetella bronchiseptica, and canine borrelia burgdorfer (Lyme) vaccine.

Vaccines not recommended because “evidence for the efficacy of these vaccines is minimal and they may “produce adverse events with limited benefit’” 2 are: canine corona virus, canine giardia ssp., canine adenovirus-1, canine rattlesnake vaccine, and canine Porphyromonas vaccine.

Now that you know the types of shots dogs should receive, let’s talk about why you might avoid having your dog take those shots.

Reasons to Not Self-Administer Dog Vaccine

Certain dog populations should not receive canine vaccinations unless a veterinarian recommends it. If your dog is in one of the following groups, please consult your vet prior to giving them vaccines:

  • Puppies younger than six to eight weeks
  • Dogs with a history of an adverse reaction to vaccines
  • Nursing or pregnant bitches
  • Dogs that are recovering from surgery or ill
  • Dogs that are being treated with glucocorticoids

Also, many vets are now recommending that senior dogs stop receiving routine immunizations after they reach a certain age. Be sure to ask your vet's advice about this matter and follow his or her recommendations.

Pros of Self-Administering Canine Vaccinations

Here are some common advantages of doing canine shots yourself instead of taking your dog to the vet.

1. No need to transport the animal to the vet or restrain it in the waiting room.

2. Dogs that receive an injection in a familiar environment are less stressed.

3. Administering shots yourself saves money because no office call fees or transportation costs are incurred.

4. Buying the vaccines and other supplies may be more cost-effective than paying for a shot at the vets.

5. Shots can be given at your convenience, so you can plan them around your schedule.

Now that we know the pros, let's take a look at the cons.

Cons of Self-Administered Dog Vaccine

Here are some of the drawbacks of home-injected canine shots.

  1. Vaccines may expire before they are used up, wasting money.
  2. Some vaccinations, like rabies shots, cannot be self-administered by owners.
  3. Dogs may have a severe reaction to the shots; are you prepared to react to an emergency?
  4. It is difficult to be assured of the quality and freshness of the vaccines; how do you know how long they have been sitting on a shelf?
  5. Additives, called adjuvants, may cause cancer or immunological diseases.
  6. Vaccines may accidentally get into the dog’s eyes, nose, or mouth and cause an adverse reaction.
  7. Vaccines can exacerbate canine allergies.
  8. Large dogs can be difficult to restrain during injections.
  9. Your pet misses out on a routine checkup by your vet, who might notice an illness or condition that is starting to develop such as canine arthritis.
  10. Do you need a prescription for needles and syringes for dog vaccine? According to the Doctors Foster and Smith website, you will need one if you live in New York, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois or New Jersey.

We’ve covered a lot of information, but now you can make an informed decision on the question: “Can I give my dog shots myself?”

Additionally, should you choose to go that route, you learned that you can buy supplies online from companies like Doctors Foster and Smith. Another resource to check are the local farm supplies stores.

No matter whether you decide to administer the shots yourself, or rely on your vet, you can be assured that you have acted in the best interests of your pet.

Expert Tips: Give Dog Shots at Home

References & Resources

UC Davis Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis VMTH Canine and Feline Vaccination Guidelines (Revised 11/2009)

Doctors Foster and Smith,

Vinton Veterinary Hospital,

More by this Author

Can I Give My Dog Shots At Home? Share Your Thoughts 11 comments

DonnaCosmato profile image

DonnaCosmato 4 years ago from USA Author

Thanks for the feedback and compliments AEvans. Although I've given our cat her insulin shots, I haven't ventured into immunizations yet but we are weighing the costs savings to see if it makes sense. Since we are down from 4 cats and 4 dogs to one of each, it may or may not be justified.

AEvans profile image

AEvans 4 years ago from SomeWhere Out There

Although we utilize our Vet for our pets, I just recently gave all of them there 7 in 1 for the year. We purchased it from the feed store and the bottles were not expired. I have given our dogs there shots in the past, but when check-up time came of course our Vet gave them over again. Lololo! Informative hub and a great read.:)

DonnaCosmato profile image

DonnaCosmato 4 years ago from USA Author

Hi Cat R, and thanks for sharing this valuable information with everyone. Grouping your order with others is a good money saving idea as well.

Cat R profile image

Cat R 4 years ago from North Carolina, U.S.

You can get the shots for $5.99 (5-Way)/$6.99 (Bordetella) at most Tractor Supply/Farm Stores too. Or order them at Dr.Foster/Dr. Smith online. I bought a 25 dose 5-Way for roughly $75 or so. I think it came out to $2.40 per shot. Get your friends together and order together. The box of syringes was like $15 for 100. And if you have good rescues around you, you can get the rabies for less than $10 when they do their rabies clinics. At least in NC.

DonnaCosmato profile image

DonnaCosmato 4 years ago from USA Author

Thanks, Eddy, for the nice to hear from you today! I hope all is well in Wales and I'm anxious to read your next hub:)

DonnaCosmato profile image

DonnaCosmato 4 years ago from USA Author

Thanks, moonlake, for reading and commenting on this hub about giving dogs shots at home. I'm glad it is working well for you; Drs. Foster and Smith's staff was incredibly nice when I called them to get the information for this piece. If I ever decide to do home vaccinations, I'll definitely patronize them:)

DonnaCosmato profile image

DonnaCosmato 4 years ago from USA Author

Thank you for your kind words, Moon Lightened...they brightened my day! I've always wondered if giving our dogs shots at home would really save us that much money, especially since I'm one of those squeamish people:)

Deborah Brooks profile image

Deborah Brooks 4 years ago from Brownsville,TX

I hope I never have to give any dog or any one a shot.. I never wanted to be a I always take my animals to the vet. but thanks for writing a great informative HUB... I voted up...

Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

A very well informed hub which I am sure will benefit many who read.

I vote up and look forward to reading many more by you.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 4 years ago from America

We live by Foster and Smith so we buy our dogs and cats vaccines from them. The rabies shot we get at the vet so at that time the dogs get checked by the vet.

Good hub and good information.

Moon Lightened profile image

Moon Lightened 4 years ago from Delhi, India

Very useful hub, Donna and well written. I've wondered about these things in the past and now you've given a brilliant resource. Well done!

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