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Facts About Blue Nose and Red Nose Pit Bulls

Updated on December 10, 2016
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Adrienne Farricelli is a former veterinary hospital assistant and now a certified dog trainer, behavior consultant, and author of dog books.

Blue Nose Pit Bull Versus Red Nose Pit Bull

Difference between blue nose pit bull and red nose pit bull.
Difference between blue nose pit bull and red nose pit bull.

First off, Pit Bulls are Not Really a Particular Dog Breed...

What are pit bulls?
What are pit bulls?

When you think of the word pit bull, do you think about a particular breed? Turns out, a pit bull is not really a dog breed per se, but rather a term that is loosely used to depict a particular type of dog. However, name the word pit bull and people will give you different answers depending on who you ask!

If you ask the general public, the term is often used to vaguely depict dogs who share similar characteristics such as a muscular, stocky body and a blocky head. If you ask journalists, the term is used to depict any large vicious dog who ends up injuring anybody and becomes worthy of being slapped on the local newspaper's headline. If you ask the average dog owner, answers may vary widely. Even experts at times have a hard time defining what a pit bull truly is, as the term has been heavily muddled and its true meaning still remains shrouded in ambiguity.

All this vagueness over the term has created quite some confusion, so much so that many dog breeds and even mutts are being mislabeled as pit bulls! To get a grasp of the idea, take a look at this "find the pit bull" test. It depicts dozens of dogs who are often confused for a pit bull. If you try to give the test a try, don't feel bad if you miss; countless people require several attempts to get it right!

But The Term Can Be Formally Used to Depict Particular Breeds.

Source

To make things even more confusing, the term pit bull had been used to depict formal dog breeds, more specifically the American Pit Bull Terrier (APBT) often times along with the American Staffordshire Terrier (AST) and the Staffordshire Bull Terrier (SBT) -. And to make things even more confusing, some others will also add the American Bulldog in the "pit bull" dog breed category!

For sake of clarity, the term pit bull is used to depict a certain type of dog, just like the term "hound" is used to depict breeds within the hound category like the beagle, bloodhound and basset hound and the term 'setter' has been used to depict breeds within the setter category like the English setter, Gordon setter, Irish red and white setter and the Irish setter. But then, if one is asked exactly what type of pit bull? One can then go more into specifics and give out the exact breed name within the pit bull category.

What does the term pit bull really mean by the way? The term pit bull derives from the ancient bloody sports of bear- baiting and bull-baiting. In these bloody sports dogs that originated from the Bull and Terrier, a fighting dog developed in the 1800’s, were forced to face these animals in the pit fighting circuit for entertainment purposes. Years later, when these bloody sports where finally outlawed in Great Britain in 1835, these dogs were then introduced to the United States by English immigrants who employed them on their farms. Back in those old days, coat color and nose color was probably the least important thing considered. All that mattered is that these dogs were able to excel in what they were bred for and takeover certain tasks.

Rather than a specific breed, pit bull is more of a generic term to describe a group of dogs with similar characteristics — much as are “hound” and “terrier” — and encompasses both mixes and pure-bred dogs.

— Lisa Peterson, spokeswoman for the American Kennel Club

Blue Pit Bulls are Pit Bulls With Blue Noses...

Picture of blue nose pit bull
Picture of blue nose pit bull

Are you wondering what a blue nose pit bull is? Here are some interesting blue nose pit bull facts. In case you haven't noticed, the average nose color of most dog breeds is black; however in the blue-nosed pit bull, the color of the nose’s leather (skin) just like the name implies, is blue.Here comes the element of surprise: despite what you may have heard, the blue nose pit bull is not an entirely separate breed of dog, it's simply a pit bull who happens to have a blue nose.

A pit bull with a blue nose mostly has what we know as “a blue coat”. Alright, before you get confused about what this mean when we say blue, it is not like the electric blue or Smurfette blue one thinks of when you think about colors. It is a little bit different from the conventional blue color you are used to, in the dog world it's more like a grayish color ranging from light silver to a deep charcoal.

The blue coat color in dogs is as a result of a dilution of the color black. For a puppy to get a blue coat color, he must come from parents who are carriers of the recessive dilution gene. What this implies is that the breeders purposely breeding for the blue coat colors will need to use a narrow gene pools of dogs, mostly crossing dogs who are closely related genetically (i.e. linebreeding or inbreeding.) In order to prevent genetic disorders, it is very important that you get these dogs from a breeder who is expert in what he/she is doing.

Additionally, you should be aware that research has shown that blue coats are prone to skin problems. As a result of this, some breeders are embarking on public enlightenment to let people know about these implications associated with diluted coats.

The dilute colors (fawn and blue) do have coat and skin problems and there is a ton of available information on them.

— Teri Dickinson, DVM

But They are Not as Rare as Thought.

Picture of Blue nose pit bull puppy
Picture of Blue nose pit bull puppy

Note that a pit bull with a blue nose does not signify that it comes from any rare lineage and it is also not a sign of being a member of a different type of purebred pit bull breed. You can actually easily see a lot of pit bulls with "blue nose" colors.

Come to think of it; there wouldn’t be so many breeders advertising them if they are truly rare! In fact, it is believed that those breeders telling you that blue nose pit bulls are specially rare are doing so in order to increase the value of their pit bulls and force you into paying more for them!

Information from The Real Pit bull website shows that unscrupulous breeders who only focus on producing the “special” blue coat color with the “rare” blue nose, have almost no consideration to temperament and health. Breeding just for a specific coat color with little regards to other factors is a poor breeding practice.

Another thing to consider is that some breeders eager to make fast money, started to cross American Staffordshire Terriers with American pit bull terriers in hopes of attaining a "rare" blue coat color with its accompanying blue nose. So if you notice blue pit bulls that carry exaggerated features such as massive bodies, blocky heads, wide chest and heavy bone structure, you are likely looking at the result of these crosses, dogs known as "American bullies" which, according to the United Kennel Club, are simply American Pit Bull Terriers "blended with stock from other bull breeds." To put it more bluntly, they are simply poorly bred American pit bull terriers.

However, not all breeders of blue-nose pit bulls are crooks. Sure if they advertise them as rare or ask a premium price, this is a big red flag, but sometimes there are genuine breeders who pay more attention to producing blue-coated specimens that are healthy and have a stable temperament. In summary, you must put a dog’s temperament and health above coat or nose color.

Here's an interesting fact: Did you know that the term “Blue Lust” was coined over the past few years due to their high demand and associated high price tags of blue-nosed pit bulls?

Facts About Blue Nose Pit bull

Same Story Goes with Red Nose Pit Bulls...

Picture of red nose pit bull
Picture of red nose pit bull

Want some interesting red nose pit bull facts? Well, here are some. Reports show that the Red Nose Pit bull and the Blue Nose Pit bull are among the most popular pit bull ‘types” people look for every day. Now here's the big fact: it is wrong to make statements such as "My dog is of the blue nose pit bull type" or the "red-node type" just as it would be wrong to say "My yellow Labrador is the black-nose type" as we're only talking about color!

So a red-nose pit bull is just a pit bull that happens to have a red nose, it is not a different breed of dog, and as such, it is not rare or expensive as some unscrupulous breeders may want people to believe! The term red-nose and blue-nose are therefore for the most part backyard breeder terms. Nowadays, pit bulls with a red coat ranging from deep red to light honey red are very popular and so is the associated red nose.

Now, here is where things get even more confusing! You may have heard about red nose pit bull that originated from the bloodline:Old family red nose" (OFRN) of Ireland. These were dogs belonging to a tight-knit family that were often inbred and who excelled in the pit. These dogs weren't purposely bred for color, but rather for their gameness. It only happened that since they were genetically close, this made it easy to pass on certain traits–and so came along the red coat, red lips red toe nails, red or amber eyes and red nose. William J. Lightner and Con Feeley were breeders who worked hard on this lineage.

The hype about "red nose" pit bulls may have therefore originated from the Old Family Red Nose dogs lineage out of Ireland. Unscrupulous breeders may have started calling any pit bull with a red nose as "red nose" making people believe that they were a different breed and particularly rare. Just because a pit bull dog has a red nose doesn't mean it's from the old family strain!

Pit Bulls come in almost every color that is genetically possible in dogs. Some colors are more common (brindle or fawn for instance); some colors you don't see as often (such as spotted or black and tan). One thing is for certain, however: blue and red nosed dogs do NOT fall into the "rare" category

— Mary Harwelik /The Real Pit Bull

But a Nose Color Does Not a Breed Make...

Red nose pitbull versus blue nose pit bull
Red nose pitbull versus blue nose pit bull

Know that we have looked at some blue nose pit bull facts and some red nose pit bull facts, here's the bottom line. If we look beyond coat color and nose color, we must recognize that pit bulls whether they are the American Pit Bull Terrier (APBT), the American Staffordshire Terrier (AST) or the Staffordshire Bull Terrier (SBT) are all beautiful dogs and are priceless as they are unique in their own ways.

Pit bulls are loving creatures who are loyal and love to shower their owners with love and affection and nose color or coat color ultimately plays a little role in all this. A nose color does not a breed make.

© 2016 Adrienne Janet Farricelli

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      Tina 6 months ago

      It's nice to have read this article. Is there any help for The training of the pit bulls? For everyone to get along.

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      Adrienne Janet Farricelli 6 months ago from USA

      Hi Tina, I have a bunch of training articles if you look for them, and one that also specifically addresses pit bulls.

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      Bree 6 months ago

      Thank you for that. Agree but most people would not. So many people get APBT, Amstaff, bully breed mixed up. That have a amstaff and say it's a pit bull. Couldn't tell you how many agreements I have been in over their breed. Me personally know and own pit bulls and diffently know the difference. I wish people would recognize the breed they actual own. Hope people read this article.

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      Jenn 2 months ago

      I'm confused on your take on the term "Pit Bull". Is your stand that it is a term or that it is a breed?

      I have been a rescuer for 6 years now, rescuing all breeds. Taking in about 89 dogs a month. I can say without a doubt that there is most certainly a PitBull breed. The improper use of the name as a term to blanket a group of dogs is one of the largest problems in rescue. In fact if it's many dogs killed all over the country and should be Banished. It is not like saying Mastiff Breeds and having categories like English, Cane Cane, Great Dane... those are all types of mastiffs. There is only one American Pitbull Terrier. A Staffordshire bull terrier is not a pitbull and should not be classified as one. A bulldog is not a pitbull and should not be classified as one. A bully is not a pitbull and should not be classified as one. A bull terrier is not a pitbull and should not be classified as one. An old English bulldog is not a pitbull and should not be classified as one. There are so many new breeds that look close to a Pitbull which have 0 Pitbull DNA yet are euthanized in certain shelters because they do not adopt a pitbull's. And exotic bully is a mix of different types of bulldogs. As in French bulldogs, English bulldogs and a Boston terrier. However the resemble a Pitbull and are euthanized by shelter's that do not adopt out Pitbulls because of this use of Pitbull breeds as a term. There are no pitbull breeds. There are mastiff breed, there are bulldog breeds, there are terrier breeds, there are NO PITBULL BREEDS. By allowing people to use this blanket term which in fact is not true, dogs are dying for looking like another dog.

      Pitbulls are are no more dangerous than a Rottweiler, doberman, Mastiff, or any other large strong breed. People choose to not train the breed accordingly to its needs but, that's a whole different box off cookies.

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      Adrienne Janet Farricelli 2 months ago from USA

      Jenn, welcome to the pit bull condondrum! It's not really my "take", but what I have been hearing being around people and reading on the subject. I agree that a bull dog is not a pit bull, an old English bull dog is not a pit bull, but I hear several people claiming that the American Pit Bull Terrier (APBT), the American Staffordshire Terrier (AST) and the Staffordshire Bull Terrier (SBT) fall into the "pit bull type."

      Essentially, from my research, these 3 breeds are share the same lineage and just happened that they were just bred for different purposes and have slightly different size standards. For the most part, they simply have different bloodlines. Some of these dogs are indeed registered with more than one registry. Telling one breed from another is challenging, and even experts at times can't tell if a pit bull is an APBT, an AST or a SBT. Even DNA testing can be confusing, (source Pit Bull Rescue Central.)

      If you are asking my personal opinion, I feel like sticking to what — Lisa Peterson, spokeswoman for the American Kennel Club says."Rather than a specific breed, pit bull is more of a generic term to describe a group of dogs with similar characteristics — much as are “hound” and “terrier” — and encompasses both mixes and pure-bred dogs." I mean I think these people should know best what is meant by the term.

      If you are looking for more official statements I would ask breed clubs and the AKC for more specific elucidations. (if you do, please keep me posted on what they say!) For now, it just seems like there is no official usage or explanation for the term and it would be helpful if somebody with authority could clear things out once and for all so so many dogs are not euthanized unnecessarily.

      Pit bulls are the friendliest dogs out there! I mean I have no clue how people can see them as vicious when every time I go to stores they come to greet me and lick my face with their tail wagging happily! Owning Rottweilers myself, I can't see a mean bone in these dogs when they are raised as they should be and yes, as with any breed it ultimately all sums up to how they are raised, but as you said, that's a whole another topic! Thanks for your time and comments and I agree, the term certainly needs more elucidation as it seems like it's prone to personal interpretation, but I think it's mostly because nobody seems to agree and there hasn't been an "official definition" coming from authority figures..

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      3 weeks ago

      hy good article ,i have an american staffordshire terrier she is the most affectionate dog with us,now she is good around people when we go for walks,now she wont let people just reach n touch her she wont be agressive but she backs away,when my friends come to my house shes good with people but u got to let her come to u .wonderful dog with my kids n she like to sleep next to my bed n at night goes n lays right between both doors of my kids room ,after they go to bed.The only thing i dont play or let my kids play ruff with her since she was little ,i play with ropes with her ,i throw a ball for her to fetsh,i play a little rough with her but not to get her to the point of getting agressive,i feel she has certined limit she knows ,just by looking at her a certine way she knows im not happy if she did something,but great tempermint.American staffordshires tempermint are more of a mild temp. pits tend to be more upbeat.

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