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Sick Dog Symptoms: What to Look for Before It Is Too Late

Updated on January 31, 2017
DrMark1961 profile image

Dr Mark is a small animal veterinarian. He works mostly with dogs and exotic animals.

Your dog may not even appear depressed when he is sick.
Your dog may not even appear depressed when he is sick. | Source

If you have the time to keep a dog, you have the time to learn to perform a once-weekly do-it-yourself physical exam.

When you perform a DIY physical exam, there are times when you notice something unusual and need help. A veterinarian and his or her team will look for all of the symptoms of a sick dog and determine what is wrong and how it can be treated.

But what are the symptoms you need to look for at home?

  1. Depression: Not all dogs will act depressed when they are sick. In the wild, animals that act sick are more likely to die. You need to watch your dog at all times and be aware of what is normal for him. If your dog is depressed, do something about it.
  2. Loss of appetite: Some dogs will miss a meal at times, and you should be aware if you have the type of dog that misses meals.
  3. Vomiting and diarrhea: If your dog is healthy, one simple episode of vomitingis not too much to worry about. Follow the directions in this article if your dog continues to vomit or has uncontrollable diarrhea. You will need to get him checked out right away.

If your dog is old or has any health problems, one episode of vomiting IS something to worry about. Get him examined right away.

4. Coughing, gasping for air, or sneezing: These symptoms could just be signs of kennel cough, but if your dog is coughing and gasping it could be something much more serious.

5. Changes in the hair or skin, or itching and chewing on the feet or above the tail. Skin problems are not an emergency, but the sooner you have them taken care of, the better your dog will feel.

6. A bad odor coming from anywhere. It might be from the mouth, the ears, or even the skin.

7. Urinating in the house or urinating a lot more than normal. You might notice that your dog is also drinking a lot more than normal.

8. Difficulty getting out of bed or lameness. If you notice her dragging the tips of her back feet she should be seen immediately.

9. Any kind of abnormal discharge, swelling, or lump.

Itching, scratching, chewing on the feet, and nibbling her own skin all need to be reported.
Itching, scratching, chewing on the feet, and nibbling her own skin all need to be reported. | Source
If you have noticed any vomiting or diarrhea you should inform the vet.
If you have noticed any vomiting or diarrhea you should inform the vet. | Source

What Happens Next?

The History: You need to give a thorough history so that your sick dog can be treated quickly. The staff will be used to asking questions but if you can provide better answers things will go much quicker. They will want to know:

  1. What you have noticed? If there has been anything abnormal, even one bout of vomiting a day before you noticed anything else, be sure to let the vet nurse, vet tech, or veterinarian know.Some problems will not show up on an exam but a good history will help them find out what is wrong with your dog.
  2. What kind of food you are giving?
  3. What kind of medications are you giving? This includes heartworm preventative, flea treatments, and vaccinations.

What all is checked in a physical exam?

  1. The mouth: The lips will be rolled back so that the color of the mucous membranes can be seen.
  2. The eyes: Do the eyes appear sunken in? (Dehydration) Is the skin normal? (Pale or bloodshot.) Is there any discharge?
  3. The ears: Do they smell? Is there any discharge?
  4. The skin: Unless there is something wrong you may not even notice this part of the exam. Your vet will run his hands over the skin and look for anything abnormal.
  5. The heart and lungs: Since your vet cannot ask your dog to cough, you may notice him press down on your dog´s trachea while listening to the lungs. He will probably have his hand on the inside of the dog´s back leg to check the pulse while listening to the heart.
  6. The abdomen: Your vet will squeeze the belly and push the abdomen up to feel any abnormalities.
  7. The legs and back: His legs will be moved up and down, his joints squeezed, and your dog will even have a short test to check his nerves.
  8. The temperature: This is the last thing the vet does during the exam for a reason—no dog likes this part.

If your dog has been drooling excessively, the examination of the mouth is very important.
If your dog has been drooling excessively, the examination of the mouth is very important. | Source
The heart and lungs will be checked during every examination.
The heart and lungs will be checked during every examination. | Source

Will An Exam Always Be Enough?

Sometimes other things will need to be done if the cause of the symptoms is not obvious. Here are a few of them:

Bloodwork

  1. CBC: A complete blood count can often be run on a machine right in your vet´s clinic. It will tell you his red blood cell count, the amount of hemoglobin (a red blood cell component) and some other levels in the blood, and the number and types of white blood cells. The white blood cell information is important since it can indicate what type of infection your dog has.
  2. Blood chemistry: Some tests will be run in the clinic, others will need to be sent out and the results may take longer to show up. Basic blood chemistry will tell the vet about the kidneys, liver, pancreas, and other internal organs.
  3. Specialized tests: The vet may ask you to approve a more thorough blood chemistry panel if your dog has unusual symptoms. He may also want to check some hormones or other chemicals that are not tested for in a basic panel.

X-rays

If your dog is limping or has musculoskeletal abnormalities one of the first tests will be an x-ray. An x-ray may also be needed if your dog has vomiting and diarrhea, has abnormal blood chemistry results, has an abnormal heart, or is sick and cannot be diagnosed.

Other tests

If your dog´s problem is still not clear, or if your vet feels that more information would help treat your dog, other tests might be needed. A urinalysis (several tests of the dog´s urine) is easy and provides basic information. A fecal exam can check or worms and some other abnormalities like Giardia, a parasite found in contaminated water.

Some clinics have EKGs and echocardiograms to check the heart, ultrasound to check the internal organs, and even MRIs to check the brain.

A heartworm test might be part of the blood work on your sick dog.
A heartworm test might be part of the blood work on your sick dog. | Source

If you do not have access to a vet 24/7, this book can book help you figure out why your dog is showing symtoms of being sick.

It is always better to know what is wrong with your dog as soon as possible. Take a few minutes to learn.

To diagnose some problems, your dog will need x-rays.
To diagnose some problems, your dog will need x-rays. | Source

You can always turn down specific tests if you do not have the money, but it is your vet´s responsibility to offer everything to you that is available to find out what is wrong with your dog.

And sometimes other tests may be needed.
And sometimes other tests may be needed. | Source

© 2013 Dr Mark

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    • norlawrence profile image

      Norma Lawrence 11 months ago from California

      Very good article. Very helpful information.

      Thanks

    • DrMark1961 profile image
      Author

      Dr Mark 2 years ago from The Beach of Brazil

      Hi toknowinfo sorry I missed this! Thanks for reading, and hope you will never need any of this info!!!

    • toknowinfo profile image

      toknowinfo 2 years ago

      This is a very informative hub. You pointed out relevant issues that as a dog owner, I find very useful. Thanks as always for sharing your knowledge and very helpful tips.

    • DrMark1961 profile image
      Author

      Dr Mark 4 years ago from The Beach of Brazil

      Thanks Will.

      Dennis, I hope the tips help if you ever need them!

    • DennisDo profile image

      Dennis 4 years ago from Florida

      These are great tips. High quality information and just what I need to know for my own German Shepherd!

    • WillStarr profile image

      WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

      Sick dogs (and all animals for that matter) are especially heartbreaking because they can't tell us what's hurting in so many words. Of course they do tell us if we know where to look, and that's where you doctors come in.

      We love our veterinarians!

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