To Blanket or Not to Blanket Your Horse in the Winter? - PetHelpful - By fellow animal lovers and experts
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To Blanket or Not to Blanket Your Horse in the Winter?

Ellison is a professional horse trainer and riding instructor. She runs a summer camp program and offers kids a safe introduction to horses.

Brownie has never worn a blanket and has always been plenty warm!

Brownie has never worn a blanket and has always been plenty warm!

Does Your Horse Have a Thick Winter Coat?

If your horse has a thick winter coat, he probably will be perfectly fine without a blanket, especially if he has a stall to come into when the weather is inclement. If he lives outside in a run-in sort of situation, you may feel he does need a blanket. Just keep in mind that he has his winter coat on naturally. When we add a blanket on top of it—if he gets hot under it and then sweats—he will end up colder than he would have been without the blanket wearing a wet one.

Remember, there are a variety of blankets: there are turn out sheets, rain sheets, light, medium, and heavy-weight blankets. Take this into consideration when deciding if you are going to blanket your horse. Make sure that you choose the right blanket weight. You might need even more than one to account for temperature and seasonal changes.

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Are You Going to Clip Your Horse?

If you are going to clip your horse, you are taking away his or her own natural ability to stay warm. This puts the responsibility completely on you, or I should say whoever cares for your horse on a daily basis.

I totally understand if you want to clip your horse so that you can ride them and not have to worry about taking forever to cool them off. Just remember that if you body clip your horse, he will most definitely need a wide variety of blankets and likely a cooler to make sure that he doesn't get cold.

If you have an indoor at your farm and plan on keeping up with your training program over the winter, I think it makes perfect sense to clip and blanket your horse. If you don't have an indoor at your farm and your winter riding is going to be weather dependent, I would think twice about clipping. I would get a cooler to use to help dry the horse after a work out if he sweats, and let him keep his coat. That way, you don't have the constant worry about him being cold.

My horse Kemerton, back in the day all clipped up for winter. He had to wear multiple blankets and multiple coolers to keep him warm!

My horse Kemerton, back in the day all clipped up for winter. He had to wear multiple blankets and multiple coolers to keep him warm!

Old or Thin Horses

If your horse is old and already a little thin, blanketing is probably a good idea over the winter. You don't want your horse to burn too many calories just trying to stay warm if he is already thin in the first place.

If you have an older horse that is in good weight and has a nice, thick coat, he will probably be just fine without a blanket. Hopefully, since you are around your horse and see them regularly, you will know whether or not they will get the coat they need to stay warm enough in the winter.

If you have a horse with a high metabolism, like a thoroughbred for example, they tend to be on the thin side. I would keep a close eye on how much of a winter coat they get because, just like the older, thinner horses, you don't want them to burn all their calories keeping warm and therefore lose weight over the winter.

These two pictured, both wear blankets because their super high metabolism keeps them slender to begin with and we don't want them to lose any weight trying to keep warm!

These two pictured, both wear blankets because their super high metabolism keeps them slender to begin with and we don't want them to lose any weight trying to keep warm!

Temperature Fluctuations

We all know that mother nature can be a finicky thing. It can go from cold to hot and back again in no time at all. Remember, if your horse has a blanket on, it is up to you to make sure that it is taken off when needed and put back on when needed. It can become a chore, managing blanketing in the wintertime, which is why many farms charge an extra fee in the winter for blanketing.

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Just Because You Are Freezing Doesn't Mean Your Horse Is!

Be careful not to make the call about whether or not your horse should be blanketed based on whether or not you are freezing cold. Horses are outdoor animals and mother nature equips them with what they need to handle the winter season. If you aren't sure if your horse needs a blanket this winter, ask your trainer or barn manager for their opinion. I'm sure they would be happy to help you make the decision.

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This article is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge. It is not meant to substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, or formal and individualized advice from a veterinary medical professional. Animals exhibiting signs and symptoms of distress should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.

Comments

Ellison Hartley (author) from Maryland, USA on November 14, 2018:

sure does sound like it !

Rick Benningfield from North Texas on November 13, 2018:

It must really cost a lot to keep a horse in Japan.

Ellison Hartley (author) from Maryland, USA on November 13, 2018:

Omg, that is expensive! Hopefully, someday you will get to ride and be around horses again. Thanks for reading my article!

Ellison Hartley (author) from Maryland, USA on November 13, 2018:

I agree. I think the majority of horses are just fine without blankets.

Poppy from Enoshima, Japan on November 12, 2018:

I absolutely love horses. I used to take riding lessons when I was a child and used to go to my friend's farm and ride her horses when we were teenagers. Unfortunately, living in Tokyo does not afford me that luxury anymore. I saw an ad the other day saying 3,000 yen (around $25 USD) for 20 minutes riding a horse! Insanity.

I've seen blanketed horses before but never gave it much thought. This is a great article for those who own horses (lucky things!) and can hopefully keep these beautiful animals comfortable in the chillier months.

Rick Benningfield from North Texas on November 11, 2018:

Please remember that the normal body temperature of a horse is about 101-102 Degrees compared to our body temp of 98 Degrees. In many cases and dependant on where your live all the horse may need is an area where he can get out of the wind! This is where the stall comes in very handy. By putting them in the stall on very windy and cold days and having some hay for them to eat they will be comfortable without the use of a blanket!