Facts About Green Tree Frogs: Things to Know Before Keeping Them as Pets - PetHelpful - By fellow animal lovers and experts
Updated date:

Facts About Green Tree Frogs: Things to Know Before Keeping Them as Pets

We’re a private wildlife sanctuary located west of Brisbane, Australia and we house over 1,000 animals and more than 300 species.

The green tree frog's features have been described as cartoon-like. Wouldn't you want to take care of this one?

The green tree frog's features have been described as cartoon-like. Wouldn't you want to take care of this one?

Green tree frogs are one of the most popular pet frogs. They are just fantastic and enchanting-looking creatures. With their harmless nature and distinct physical characteristics, there is no doubt as to why many people keep them as pets. Although they are only a minor concern for extinction, these major amphibians still deserve proper care and attention to help with their reproduction and preservation.

Other Common Names for Green Tree Frogs

  • Australian green tree frog
  • White's tree frog
  • dumpy tree frog

Physical Characteristics and Behavior

Like other tree frogs, the green tree frog has large expanded discs on the tips of its toes and fingers, and its toes are fully webbed. A pair of large parotid glands extend back from the eyes onto the shoulders.

Color

Their eyes are usually a pale gold, while their thighs vary in color from yellow to maroon. The green tree frog's skin is smooth, and the top part of the frog ranges from a bright green to a dull, dark-olive green in color. The underside color can vary from white to brownish-white or pinkish. They normally have a series of white spots from the corner of their mouth to the base of their forearm.

Size

Female green tree frogs can grow up to 10 cm (4 inches), while males are a little smaller at 7.5 cm (3 inches). The largest known size is 15 cm (6 inches). They live up to about 16 years.

Behavior

These tree frogs are wonderfully curious and have individual personalities and antics. They often stick to the surface of leaves or trees and look longingly at a certain spot.

Like many frogs, green tree frogs call and make "barking" sounds. They do this not only to attract mates, but to advertise their location, usually after a rain, for reasons that are still unknown to researchers.

This green tree frog survived after being caught in a spider's web while trying to eat the spider.

This green tree frog survived after being caught in a spider's web while trying to eat the spider.

Diet

Green tree frogs catch food with their strong jaws and often will use a hand to force the food down. They are carnivorous and have been known to consume a diverse array of prey including:

  • Spiders
  • Crickets
  • Lizards
  • Cockroaches
  • Small birds and bats
  • Other frogs
  • Small mice (in captivity)

Habitat

Green tree frogs live throughout the eastern and northern parts of Australia. They prefer cool, damp places, but in more arid areas, they will often use human habitation for shelter. They can be found around human dwellings in places such as shower blocks, water tanks, and toilets.

Although they adjust well to human habitation, their natural habitats are in ponds, creeks, and trees. These natural habitats, however, are slowly disappearing because houses are being built on land that has been cleared for urbanization.

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) lists the Australian Green Tree Frog as a "least concern" species of tree frog.

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) lists the Australian Green Tree Frog as a "least concern" species of tree frog.

Reproduction and Conservation

The main danger to the green tree frog is the destruction of its habitat through wetland clearance and drainage. In addition to this, the frog is also threatened by a type of fungus called "chytrid fungus" which attacks the frog's skin.

Researchers are currently and very closely examining the effects and spread of this pathogen as it appears to have caused the decline of several species of frogs in Australia and South America.

green-tree-frogs

Adopting a Green Tree Frog

Before deciding to adopt them into your yard, it is important to consider some important things.

What to Consider Before Adopting a Tree Frog

  • Don't overfeed them. Green tree frogs tend to become obese if overfed.
  • In the wild, exertion of energy is required for a frog to capture its prey. Make sure they have enough space to explore.
  • They can make a lot of noise long into the night.
  • Set up a terrarium. This provides an environment that closely resembles their natural habit and ensures that they survive so they can continue enchanting more people.

Croaking Green Tree Frog

This article is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge. It is not meant to substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, or formal and individualized advice from a veterinary medical professional. Animals exhibiting signs and symptoms of distress should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.

Comments

itsjustmelfg1964 on April 05, 2020:

Wouldn't it be better if we just left them in their environment instead of taking away their freedom. Also they have a better chance of surviving in their own natural habitat and catching their own food instead of depending on somebody to hopefully feed them correctly.

dog cunt on April 02, 2020:

can frogs sing

Bridget on October 19, 2019:

Do these frogs smell at all

nibba on July 24, 2019:

nibbachan omegalul

Gay on May 21, 2019:

Hi Gus

wwwwsssssssssssssssssss on May 21, 2019:

frogs

tree

frogs

tree

Hunter on March 28, 2019:

I have 3 green tree frogs and a gold bell frog and they are so good this site helped me a lot thanks!!!

Daniel Barton on May 10, 2018:

I live in a mechanic shop that i run in riverdale ga.my two pets are Rufus a ausie.shepard an Hermit the shop bathroom green tree frog.

Alexander James Guckenberger from Maryland, United States of America on December 18, 2017:

Tree frogs are just so gorgeous! That picture of the frog in the spider web made me feel sick, but that photo was at least soon followed by that adorable girl with two of those beauties!

Laila T on June 22, 2017:

I just got a new Green Tree Frog! I love him/her so much I keep her with an Anole, Long Tailed Lizard, and two other frogs.

tori vredeveld on April 30, 2017:

they must be very good pet frogs!

Rythegreat on April 05, 2017:

Thank you so much this is very informative and I think this is a really cool article

kylie on December 17, 2015:

First green tree frog owners as of today...And we're all in love with Cormet & Freddo lol..They are so cute

Lola on November 18, 2012:

I have two as pets I love them to bits, couldn't just get one had to get two so they don't get lonely lol, I've got a Hugh set up for them they have so much space.. My staffie likes to sit and watch them a lot :) :)

Auntie D from California on May 29, 2011:

They are cute and really quite harmless. I have one who comes back to my pond every year. Nice and informative article.

frogs on November 17, 2010:

i realy love the green tree frogs my daugther has one as a pet.ive got several items of the green tree frog around my home (just lov them)iam also have the user name as frogs