Blue Tit Birds Nesting in My Garden

Updated on August 19, 2019
How to - Answers profile image

L.M. Reid is an Irish writer who has published many articles in magazines and online.

Birds in My Garden

A Blue Tit Using a Nest Box
A Blue Tit Using a Nest Box | Source

Wild Birds in My Garden

For the first time this year I had the privilege of seeing Blue Tits nesting in my garden. It was a wonderful experience to see them raising their young chicks. If you would like to encourage wild birds to nest in your garden, then I have outlined how to do it below.

When Do Blue Tits Prepare a Nesting Box?

This would usually be around the second part of March here in Europe. They will start to gather bits and build their nest. The birds are very good at sensing when the spring is arriving. They want to time the hatching of their chicks to coincide with other species like caterpillars. This will give them plenty of food to feed their offspring.

A Blue Tit Nesting in My Garden

Preparing a Bird Nest
Preparing a Bird Nest | Source

Where Do Blue Tits Build Nests?

These birds prefer a cavity in either tree trunks or in buildings. They look out for a very small opening that allows them to enter but keeps out larger birds and other animals. This is why they are quick to take up your invitation if you hang a nesting box in your garden.

What Do They Make Their Nests With?

You will know you have a Blue Tit taking up residence in your garden when you see it flying in and out of the nest box. It will have things like moss, wool, hair from animals and feathers. It takes around 10 days to get finished. The bird will then smooth out the nest with her body.

Bird Nest Boxes in the Garden

Blue Tit in the Garden
Blue Tit in the Garden | Source

When Do Blue Tits Lay Their Eggs?

Most birds lay their eggs in April and May. It takes time until all the eggs are produced because she only lays one egg a day. It is not uncommon for these birds to lay between 10 to 14 eggs and raise the chicks successfully. This will take a couple of weeks.

It is only then that the female bird will sit down and cover the eggs with her stomach to keep them warm and allow them to hatch. During most of this time the female bird will be fed by the male. She will also occasionally leave the nest to feed herself.

When Do the Chicks Hatch?

It takes around two weeks for the chicks to start to hatch. They will need a lot of feeding. This is the time where both parents are in and out of the nest feeding their young. The most common food they eat are caterpillars. If their parents have done their job right timing-wise, there should be an abundance of them around.

When Do the Baby Birds Leave the Nest?

It only takes around three weeks for the bald and blind chicks to develop into fledglings. They are now ready to leave the nest. They have their sight, feathers and muscles that will allow them to fly.

The parents do not return to the nest box with food as often by now. Instead, they stay outside the nest box and call out to the chicks. Eventually one of them will get up the courage to climb up to the opening and attempt to fly to the sound. It is rewarded with food.

Once there has been one successful flight the other chicks will follow suit quite quickly. They stay together as a family for up to another three weeks. During this time they are fed by the adults but are also taught how to feed themselves. They are then ready to become independent.

Chicks Leaving the Nest

How to Attract Birds to Your Garden

There are a few things you can do to make your backyard an attraction for wild birds. With just a few adjustments you can create your garden into a haven so that the birds will visit it daily.

Clean and Fresh Water

A bird bath is ideal and that is what I have. The birds are forever having a great time splashing around in the water. If you are lucky enough to have a larger garden then a water feature with pumped water cascading down on rocks will make wild birds come from far away. They are attracted by the noise and will love it to drink and bathe in.

Blue Tit Nesting in the Garden
Blue Tit Nesting in the Garden | Source

Plenty of Food

It is important that the birds know they can rely on your garden to give them plenty of food all year round. While scouting around for a suitable place to nest and rear their young this will be high on their list of essential requirements.

There are a few things you can do to increase the food supply. If you have some grass, shrubs and small trees in your garden then this is ideal. Think about adding a small fruit tree or two as well.

Supply a Variety of Bird Food

There are lots of different types of food for wild birds to eat that are in easy supply commercially. As are the bird feeders to put them in.

Sunflower seeds are very much liked by a large variety of birds so this is the best to buy if you want to see many species in your garden. You can also buy a birdseed mix which will do the job too. I usually buy the bird seed mix and suet balls for my family of wild birds.

Tray and House Feeders

These are flat surfaces that are usually free-standing. It is best to buy the ones which are covered with a roof. This will keep the food dry and safe. These will bring in starlings, finches, blue jays and sparrows.

Tube Feeders

These are the cycler feeders with tiny feeding holes so that you can put in small seeds. These feeders attract the smaller birds such as bull finches, sparrows, blue tits and robins. I prefer these tube feeders because they attract the birds I like to see in my garden and they are small enough not to overtake the garden.

Suet Feeders

These are made of wire or plastic mesh and are suspended from a tree branch or hung from some other secure wood. These feeders attract larger birds like starlings, woodpeckers and blue jays.

Birds Having a Bath
Birds Having a Bath | Source

Blue Tits in Your Garden

The Blue Tit is a very common bird found in gardens around Britain and Ireland. They are smaller than most birds and have the distinctive blue, yellow and green feathers. The male birds have brighter feathers all round especially the blue on the head.

Nest Boxes

So why not encourage Blue Tits to nest and bring up their young in your garden next year. Buy or make a few nest boxes and hang them up in the garden. All birds start looking for possible new homes in the winter. So make sure you have them placed securely by then.

It really is fascinating to see these beautiful birds flying in and out making their nest. Once you see the male bird feeding the female inside the box then you know she has laid all her eggs and is now keeping them warm.

The most exciting time for me was being able to hear that the chicks had hatched. And seeing the parents flying in and out trying to keep them all fed.

Wild Birds in the Garden

What is Your Favourite Wild Bird

See results

How to Put Up a Nest Box

Questions & Answers

    Comments

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment
      • How to - Answers profile imageAUTHOR

        L M Reid 

        5 weeks ago from Ireland

        Yes Peggy it is the first year that the birds used the boxes, I was delighted.

        Hello moonlake, yes it was very exciting seeing them flying in and out of the nest.

        Rose, yes it is nice to see the birds in the garden. Oh I would love a parrot, I bet you enjoy it.

      • roc6 profile image

        Rose 

        5 weeks ago from Cape Town, South Africa

        Thank you, I loved your hub, I love all kinds of birds, I have a Senegal Parrot, we have three lovebirds in the house as well.

      • moonlake profile image

        moonlake 

        5 weeks ago from America

        How cute and what sweet little birds. I enjoyed your hub.

      • Peggy W profile image

        Peggy Woods 

        6 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

        What beautiful little birds! It must be fun to see them nesting in your birdhouse and seeing the little ones emerge. I do not think that I have ever seen one in the wild.

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, pethelpful.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://pethelpful.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
      ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)